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Albert Pujols diagnosed with plantar fascia tear

Jul 28, 2013, 1:47 PM EDT

albert pujols getty Getty Images

2013 just went from bad to worse for Albert Pujols.

According to beat writer Mike DiGiovanna of the Los Angeles Times, the first baseman (err, designated hitter) was diagnosed Sunday with a partial tear of the plantar fascia in his left foot and has been placed on the 15-day disabled list. There is no timetable for his return, and it’s possible that he is done for the year. Kole Calhoun was recalled from Triple-A Salt Lake City to fill the vacant 25-man roster spot.

Pujols, who signed a a 10-year, $250 million free agent contract with the Angels in December 2011, has posted a weak .258/.330/.437 batting line in 99 games this season. Anaheim is currently 12 games back of Oakland in the American League West.

The 33-year-old acknowledged to the LA Times earlier this month that he might need foot surgery.

  1. riverace19 - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:05 PM

    That’s what happens when you keep playing at age 47… Disaster season continues for the Halos

    • cohnjusack - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:16 PM

      Again, please provide any proof, actual or even anecdotal that he is older than he says he is. Since he has had what is actually a remarkably normal aging curve for an MLB player, I find this talk to be incredibly stupid at best and borderline racist at worst.

      • ryanrockzzz - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:39 PM

        Sensitive much? It’s a blog, he could have been joking with that comment above ?

        Many Latin American players fudge their age, although it’s not safe to say if Albert has done that. The reason people bring it up is because it does happen with players from all backgrounds, but especially with international players trying to make it. It really does not matter anyways, injuries and normal wear and tear seem to be breaking him down. I really don’t think he’s like 50 years old.

      • cohnjusack - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:36 PM

        Classic hilarious joke! The one that’s been made roughly 50 million times for the past 12 years.

        Yeah, I’m am a wee bit sensative to the constant barrage of baseless allegations that occur any time any latino player has the slightest decline in production. Hey, if there’s proof of it, by all means. But when there’s none…yeah, you come off like a shithead for always lobbing the allegation.

      • American of African Descent - Jul 28, 2013 at 5:19 PM

        He could have been joking. Monkeys might also spontaneously fly out of my ass tonight. I would not bet on either, though.

      • tonirigatoni - Jul 28, 2013 at 5:28 PM

        How many Caucasian players have lied about their age? How many Latinos? Nuff said.

      • hijackthemic - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:55 PM

        I don’t have to guess to know it’s not just people on HardballTalk who ignore what you say.

    • cohnjusack - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:18 PM

      Hey look! Here’s another player whose numbers have started to drastically decline when he hit 30 and now is an injury-mangled mess. Certainly you’ve leveled the accusation that he’s lying about his age too, right?

      http://www.baseball-reference.com/players/t/teixema01.shtml

      • danfrommv - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:59 PM

        In fact, he won’t be accused of using steroids because of the drastic age-appropriate decline. Good hire, Jerry DiPoto

    • deathmonkey41 - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:51 PM

      Must be that time of the month again…

    • fanofevilempire - Jul 28, 2013 at 5:46 PM

      100-200 million dollar contracts are not such a good idea, especially when a guy is already in hid mid 30’s, look at Cano, I don’t know if that contract he sign will be signing will be such a good idea on the back end of the deal.

    • gmsingh - Jul 28, 2013 at 7:09 PM

      The expression “money well spent” comes to mind.

  2. jetsfan79 - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:07 PM

    At least arod produced his first 6 or 7 years. That contract is by far the worst in baseball history

    • cohnjusack - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:12 PM

      Which contract? If you remember, A-Rod opted out of his contact at the end of 2007 and signed a new 10-year $275 million dollar deal.

      Pujols was good/not great last year and hurt this year. I’m not convinced he’s totally dead weight on one bad year (it COULD be, but I’m not convinced it is yet).

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:18 PM

        2008-2010 Arod:

        .286/.378/.537 for a 137 OPS+

        2011-12 Pujols:

        .275/.338/.485 – 130 OPS+ and getting worse

    • sportsfan18 - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:57 PM

      jetsfan79

      Due to Albert’s decline over the past couple of years, so many are forgetting what he did before then in his career.

      He produced his first 6 or 7 yrs you say?

      For his first 10 consecutive seasons he hit higher than .300 with 30 plus HR’s and over 100 RBI’s.

      In his 11th season he hit .299 with 30 plus HR’s and 99 RBI’s.

      In 5 of his first 10 seasons, he hit .330 or higher. His lowest batting average his first 10 seasons was a .312.

      He hit 40 HR’s or more in 6 of his first 10 seasons.

      Other than his rookie year, in his 2nd through his 11th season, he had more walks than strikeouts each of those seasons, meaning he did this for 10 consecutive seasons.

      Yes, his current contract IS terrible and the Angels were’t bright to sign him for what they did.

      He “only” made like $100 million in the first part of his career and he was way underpaid relative to his production.

      His first 10 or 11 seasons are one of the best ever in all of MLB history to begin a career.

      He did FAR more than just produce during them. People talk about a “peak” for HOF players using JAWS and WAR.

      His PEAK was his first 11 seasons when most talk of peaks as being like 5 or 6 yrs.

      To be eligible for the MLB Hall of Fame, one needs to play a minimum of 10 seasons. His PEAK exceeded this as his first 11 seasons were incredible.

      ONE LAST COMMENT. Currently, in ALL of the MLB, there are only two hitters this yr with an OPS of 1000 or higher. I don’t want to take the time to look this up, but each year only a few players are able to have an OPS of 1000 or higher.

      Albert’s CAREER OPS is STILL higher than 1000 even with his struggles over the past couple of years.

      8 of his first 10 seasons his OPS was higher than 1000.

      Yeah, he PRODUCED alright at the beginning of his career.

      • wretchu - Jul 29, 2013 at 10:05 AM

        To be fair, when he signed that $100M deal, a lot of people thought the Cardinals were crazy for signing player to a deal that long for that much money so early in his career. Imagine if the Nationals offered Bryce Harper $100M over 7 years with no-trade protection after the end of next season. Yes, Albert outperformed the contract, but hindsight is 20-20.

  3. cohnjusack - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:09 PM

    …and it looks like the 30 home run street will come to an end :( (Well, it looked like that anyway, this just seals it)

    100 Runs – First 6 seasons (Ended with 99 in 2007)
    100 RBI – First 10 seasons (Ended with 99 in 2011)
    .300 BA – First 10 Seasons (Ended at .299 in 2011)
    30 HR – First 11 seasons

    It really seems like he should hit 12 more to end his 30 HR streak with 29 HR.

  4. theaxmancometh - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:10 PM

    The Machine is now human. And with more than $200m left to go. Ouch.

    • cohnjusack - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:23 PM

      Sadly, he was human the year before he signed the deal, setting career lows in 2B, RBIs, BA, OBP, SA, OPS, OPS+, BB, Total Bases, WAR, Grounding into the most double plays in his career…and even though there is no way to spin it as a decline in skill in any way whatsoever, he also tied a career low in HBP.

  5. flamethrower101 - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:32 PM

    Now that sucks, but I can’t say with all honesty that I feel sorry for him. It’s clearly been bothering him all year and while he was in decline before this started, I believe it’s really hindered him at the plate. It’s bad enough he couldn’t run at all or field every day, but when you’re barely league-average at DH, something’s wrong.

    Hopefully he can come back next year fully healthy and able to play 1B full-time. I doubt he’ll be able to return to even the 2012 numbers he posted, but seriously he has to be better than what he was this year.

    • notsofast10 - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:58 PM

      Yes, the Plantar Fasciitis is a dastardly injury with no quick fix and it has been bothering him all year, probably one of the hardest injuries to play thru. Antonio Gates tried but could not! Just takes time and some good orthopedic insoles!!!!

      • flamethrower101 - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:27 PM

        Also the fact that he was stubborn as hell and refused to deal with it at the beginning of the year when it first flared up probably didn’t help either.

  6. 13arod - Jul 28, 2013 at 2:50 PM

    Just when he started hitting he gets hurt this explins he end of the angles season

  7. dondada10 - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:10 PM

    Hopefully it’s the sort of thing that surgery fixes and Pujols can come back to being a ~.280/.375/.500 player.

    Yes, the contract is awful. But I’m not ready to throw dirt of The Machine’s grave just yet.

  8. brannu23 - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:19 PM

    Albert Pujols has been playing with plantar fasciitis off and on since 2004. It’s something that can eventually go away but Pujols has played through it for a long time. This is from wikipedia: “Although Pujols was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis during the second half of the season, he finished the season with a .331 average (fifth in the league), 196 hits (fifth), 51 doubles (second to Lyle Overbay’s 53), 46 home runs (tied with Adam Dunn for second behind Adrián Beltré’s 48) and 123 RBIs (third, behind Vinny Castilla’s 131 and Scott Rolen’s 124) in 154 games.” That was 2004, playing with the injury that might end his season. I only knew that he had been playing with it a long time because I’m a Cardinals fan. But … it could be a blessing in disguise. Time to fix it rather than play through it.

  9. andreweac - Jul 28, 2013 at 3:37 PM

    Worst professional sports contract of all time. Nothing is remotely close. Albertross strikes again.

  10. hcf95688 - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:00 PM

    The combination of HGH and being 45 years old seems to have caught up with him.

  11. tbutler704 - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:02 PM

    At least the Yanks got a World Series and a few MVP-type years out of Rodriguez before he went to sh@t….

  12. newyorkshets - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:07 PM

    Nice job Angels errrr Jerry Dipoto. Enjoy the cellar of the American League. Don’t worry the Houston Astros will keep you company.

    • tbutler704 - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:16 PM

      Don’t forget that reefer smoking baseball team in the Pacific NW. They’ve won a handful of games lately, but they’re still craptastic.

      • Conor Dowley - Jul 28, 2013 at 4:54 PM

        Reefer smoking baseball team? Because pot got legalized in Washington? Oh, that’s real clever. You should do standup.

    • asimonetti88 - Jul 28, 2013 at 5:28 PM

      I find it amusing that people think the Pujols signing was Dipoto and not Arte Moreno.

  13. losanginsight - Jul 28, 2013 at 5:58 PM

    Does this mean Jerry’s seat is hot?

  14. bgm9876 - Jul 28, 2013 at 7:44 PM

    Do you think he will play again this year?

  15. fearthehoody - Jul 28, 2013 at 9:13 PM

    Roids will do that to you

    • stex52 - Jul 28, 2013 at 10:13 PM

      Tear your plantar fascia? Pray tell, how do they do that?

      And then you’d better write a paper on it. Nobody in the medical profession knows.

  16. hijackthemic - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:57 PM

    Guys at Angels’ camp reported to say he ran like he was 50 years old. Sounds about right.

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