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Report: Red Sox great George Scott has died

Jul 29, 2013, 3:15 PM EDT

Screen Shot 2013-07-29 at 3.13.36 PM

Sad news about an insanely underrated player. From Boston.com:

A newspaper in Mississippi is reporting former Red Sox slugger George Scott has passed away at age 69. Scott, known as “Boomer,” was signed by the Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1962 and made his major league debut with the Red Sox in 1966. He played eight seasons and part of another for the Red Sox from 1966 to 1971 and again from 1977 to 1979.

Scott was one of the finest defensive first basemen to ever play the game. He was a key part of the “Impossible Dream” Red Sox of 1967 and after his stint with the Brewers was back in Boston for the insanity of 1978.  For his career he had a line of .268/.333/.435 with 271 home runs and 1051 RBI. He won eight Gold Gloves.

RIP, Boomer.

  1. DelawarePhilliesFan - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:21 PM

    He hit the first Grand Slam I ever saw in person, 1978 against Seatle. Sad indeed

  2. sreske93 - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:23 PM

    His “stint with the Brewers” is where he won 5 of those 8 gold gloves

    • bronco58lb - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:42 PM

      With the Brewers in 1975, he led the AL in HR, RBI and total bases (a feat he accomplished twice with Milwaukee).

  3. mybrunoblog - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:23 PM

    Real good glove man and those pork chop side burns just scream 1970s.
    RIP Boomer.

    • bronco58lb - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:40 PM

      Nicknamed Boomer because he could hit the ball a long way.

  4. proudlycanadian - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:29 PM

    This is sad news. He was much too young to go.

  5. xpensivewinos - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:33 PM

    Dude could really hit.

    Didn’t he used to wear a funky necklace (looked like it was sharks teeth), but he used to say it was make up of teeth from the second basemen and shortstops he took out while breaking up double plays.

    I seem to recall that, but my memory is not what it once was……..

    • bronco58lb - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:39 PM

      He also wore a batting helmet in the field.

  6. sabatimus - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:34 PM

    Never did see him play, but have heard ex-players talk about him with high esteem.

    By the way, CSNNE, he was 69, not 71. Pretty embarrassing to get that one wrong on your own New England site.

    • deepstblu - Jul 29, 2013 at 4:19 PM

      There may be a discrepancy between his “baseball age” and his real age. Before the amateur draft was instituted, it was not terribly uncommon for players to knock a couple years off. Scouts sometimes encouraged it, as they could get front office approval more easily for a signing of a younger player.

  7. bronco58lb - Jul 29, 2013 at 3:39 PM

    Fenway put Scott in a funk in 1968. He hit .171 with three HR and 25 RBIs in 350 at-bats. The Green Monster was to blame for Scott’s woes. Scott lost his swing because he was trying to pull everything over the green wall.

  8. yahmule - Jul 29, 2013 at 4:49 PM

    Fantastic glove and a great character. Boomer coined the term “taters” for home runs.

  9. tonyz6060chevy - Jul 29, 2013 at 5:09 PM

    Boy this really makes me feel old . I remember when I had his 1969 and 1970 baseball card ,he and Reggie Smith were teammates on that Red Sox team those two years,along with Rico Petrocelli and Carl Yaztremski. where does the time go .it was great to have seen you play on NBC Saturday games ,with curt Gowdy and Tony Kubeck ,all those years ago ,George. I used to love to see your team battle it out with the Orioles and Yankees

  10. makeham98 - Jul 29, 2013 at 5:19 PM

    Sox fans never “forgave” him after the team traded Cecil Cooper to the Brewers to bring him back, terrible trade. I remember one hr, probably around 1980, where the fans had been rough on him for a while, demanding a curtain call which he wouldn’t answer. Finally Tiant came out and waved his hat, which the crowd loved.

  11. nbjays - Jul 29, 2013 at 5:46 PM

    Back in the mid-70s, a buddy and I used to amuse ourselves at the high school ball diamond by hitting fly balls to each other. Being Red Sox fans back then, we’d go through the Bosox lineup as we hit balls. I still remember Burleson – Doyle – Scott – Yaz being the top of our lineup.

    RIP Boomer.

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