Skip to content

How is baseball counting A-Rod’s violations, anyway?

Jul 30, 2013, 2:30 PM EST

MLB Commissioner Bud Selig speaks during a news conference in New York Reuters

If A-Rod gets major discipline, it’s going to be because he’s seen as being a multiple-time violator of the drug agreement. Bill Madden of the Daily News was on the Boomer and Carton show today and he was asked what those multiple violations might look like. Here’s Madden:

“We are talking here (about) non-analytical violations, i.e. in absence of a positive drug test,” he said. “OK? Now, let’s just say for example, they have proof — good proof, legitimate proof, records, whatever — that Alex Rodriguez sought to buy drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez actually bought drugs. That’s a violation. Now they have proof that Alex Rodriguez was administered drugs. That’s a third violation.”

Um. OK.

Of course if that were the case every single player who ever tested positive for PEDs would be subject to triple discipline. Because to do that you have to first “seek to buy drugs” then you have to buy drugs then you have to take drugs.  I mean, that’s 100% unavoidable, yes?

I realize Bill Madden is not in charge of the discipline process, but he certainly has sources in MLB who are informing him of the thought process involved with the Biogenesis case. And this is what is passing for logic and justice with respect to A-Rod. We are in a world gone mad. Although, if you think about it, we could use this logic to shorten games:

[Batter at plates, Ump looks in. Batter swings and misses.]

Umpire: “Strike one-two-three, you’re out!!”

Player: “What?!”

Ump: “You thought about swinging, you swung, you missed! You’re out!”

[everyone nods and smiles at how nice it is that umpires are getting tough on batters]

  1. Doug - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:38 PM

    It’s been a while since I’ve been in Sunday school, but don’t the Catholics have a thing exactly like this? It’s a sin to have an impure thought, it’s a sin to have the desire to act upon the impure thought, and it’s a sin to actually act upon an impure thought. The number of sins that can surround a single Victoria’s Secret catalog are enough to cause a serious Catholic guilt spiral.

    • El Bravo - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:42 PM

      Boobz.

      • fanofevilempire - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:23 PM

        they can add ” thinking ” about buying and administering the drug too, I mean
        if there is no method to the madness why not.

    • largebill - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:47 PM

      Doug,

      You’re not far off, but you are missing the larger point about forgiveness. One need to only sincerely confess one’s sins and ask forgiveness and all are forgiven. So, while yes technically impure thoughts and the desire to act upon those thoughts are sins as much as impure actions you don’t get sent to hell three times. You either go to hell or ya don’t. Unlike baseball God does not attempt to punish three times for one positive test (impure thought, desire, act).

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:48 PM

      Nah, as Catholics we only have to follow the rules we think are important. Like during Lent, you’re not supposed to eat meat on Fridays, unless you forget (Jim Gaffigan).

    • deathmonkey41 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:42 PM

      Victoria Secret models are nice, but give me good, old-fashioned hardcore porn any day of the week. I’m just old school like that.

  2. jtorrey13 - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:39 PM

    I thought about commenting.

    • jtorrey13 - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:40 PM

      I commented.

      • jtorrey13 - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:40 PM

        I read my comment.

      • raysfan1 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:32 PM

        Putabam, loquebar, lexi

        Doesn’t quite roll off the tongue like veni, vidi, vici. Pity.

  3. El Bravo - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:41 PM

    Triple jeopardy! My fave!

    • DJ MC - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:09 PM

      Hmm…do I make the Ashley Judd Double Jeopardy joke, or the Sean Connery Celebrity Jeopardy joke?

      • RickyB - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:14 PM

        If you have to ask …

      • cohnjusack - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:15 PM

        Neither. You go classy and make a reference to the Rex Stout book Triple Jeapordy, a collection of mysteries about everyone favorite obese detective Nero Wolfe.

    • bigharold - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:45 PM

      More like Dean Wormer: Double Secret Probation”.

      Madden has been the defacto mouthpiece for MLB during mnuch of this mess. If he is regurgitating what his overlords at MLB are thinking, .. it doesn’t pass the laugh test. A-Rod is going to crucify them in court and they’ll look even stupider than this BS sounds.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:26 PM

        If they thought A-Rod would crucify them in court I doubt we’d be seeing this. Clearly, that can not be the case, or Ryan Braun would still be lying through his teeth. I think they feel fairly comfortable with what they have on A-Rod.

      • bigharold - Jul 30, 2013 at 10:32 PM

        MLB has lost every major encounter with the union, .. everyone.

        They are overplaying their hand. The law doesn’t seem to be on their side. This has all the makings of MLB getting its collective ass handed to it yet again.

  4. DelawarePhilliesFan - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:44 PM

    1 for the money
    2 for the show
    3 to make ready
    Now go, A-Roid, go

  5. sdelmonte - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:44 PM

    So clearly all the other people they caught didn’t try to buy PEDs. Or buy them. Some phantom just showed up in their lives with a free syringe full of the stuff. Clearly.

    • Francisco (FC) - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:48 PM

      Come on! Everyone knows it was the PED fairy that left them under their pillows while they slept at night.

    • supersnappy - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:13 PM

      The other guys make the PEDs themselves

    • btilghman - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:52 PM

      Wasn’t that Palmeiro’s defense?

  6. largebill - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:49 PM

    Craig,

    Obviously this is not a courtroom, but is it possible that the league could overplay their hand on A-Rod and see the whole mess dismissed by an arbitrator?

  7. 12strikes - Jul 30, 2013 at 2:50 PM

    “Of course if that were the case every single player who ever tested positive for PEDs would be subject to triple discipline. Because to do that you have to first “seek to buy drugs” then you have to buy drugs then you have to take drugs. I mean, that’s 100% unavoidable, yes?”

    Craig, it is ABSOLUTLY 100% AVOIDABLE.

    If the player that is juicing in the next locker over throws you a bottle of something and tells you to try it and you do, you did not SEEK or BUY but you did use them.

    • lazlosother - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:04 PM

      On the other hand, you caught what he threw, that’s strike one. You decided to take what he threw, that’s strike two. You took what he threw, that’s strike three.

    • rbj1 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:24 PM

      You don’t take a single steroid pill one time only, that conveys no benefit. And if you’re on a regimen of taking an unknown substance, you should be punished for stupidity.

      • raysfan1 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:37 PM

        See: Palmeiro, Rafael for an example of guilty of juicing, insufferable stupidity, or both.

  8. lazlosother - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:02 PM

    Lets remember this is Bill Madden. I’m thinking he’s a little confused on this one because if Selig goes in that direction he is going to get his ass kicked, even if he wins in the end. So far the MLBPA has not fought MLB on this and has encouraged guilty players to accept the punishment. If the worm forces war on them it could have repercussions for all the players involved except Braun.

    Does Bud really want 15+ players going the arbitrator route? I would think he wants to do this without making it a long, drawn out, gloriously grotesque spectacle. But maybe thats just me.

    • yxlbar - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:03 PM

      It’s Bill Madden on a radio hit, as well (as opposed to a published article). No reason we should take this as indicative of what MLB’s thinking.

  9. sal11 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:11 PM

    Looks like Selig attended Roger Goodell’s seminar, “How to administer excessive punishment by making things up.”

    • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:14 PM

      I must have missed MLB’s release of actual information about any of these cases. Do we know yet what they’ve made up? That’s a good one, though, making up facts about an investigation so you can accuse it of making up facts!!

      • sal11 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:28 PM

        “[Bill Madden] certainly has sources in MLB who are informing him of the thought process involved with the Biogenesis case. And this is what is passing for logic and justice with respect to A-Rod.”

        This is what the post itself says. I’d rather not bother with a three-paragraph disclaimer (“Warning: the below comment assumes the rumor in the above post to be true,” etc.) at the beginning of every comment I make. If you don’t like speculating based off rumors, you should stop reading, well, the entire internet I guess.

      • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:36 PM

        Just pointing out that you’re making stuff up in a convoluted effort to accuse MLB of making things up. If you don’t want your empty arguments critiqued, you should stop posting on, well, the entire internet I guess.

  10. themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:12 PM

    I don’t know what Bill Madden knows and the logic of his statements is silly. That said, it is not at all hard to imagine multiple violations coming from each of these Biogenesis cases. Let’s assume for the purposes of argument here that there are perfect records that show that a player used PEDs from this firm systematically for five years, and that each player did 20 cycles and 100 total injections. How many violations? None, because he never tested positive? One because it all came out at once? 20 – one for each cycle? Or 100 – one for each injection?

    I’m from Chicago, and we had a guy named John Wayne Gacy kill 33 young men back in the day. He was caught after the 33rd, and then he was arrested, charged and convicted of killing all 33. To argue that all these violations of the JDA and CBA are only “one event” would be like charging Gacy for only one crime. Each time the needle went in (or the cream went on) the player knew he was violating the drug program and was subject to discipline. One does not get a freebie because he was able to beat the system with a negative test result each time.

    Again, I don’t know what the evidence is; but if there is strong evidence of serial PED use over months or years, I don’t get how that could be considered one violation. Somebody help me out – give me some of that Pro-PED juice that’s going around here….

    • chadjones27 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:26 PM

      I love when people compare A-Rod to serial killers.

      Some people like to put the hype in hyperbole.

      • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:31 PM

        I love when people can’t answer the point… C’mon, ball up, one violation or many?

        ps – not comparing him to a serial killer; I don’t think he should go to prison at all.

      • cur68 - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:10 PM

        Nailed it, Chad.
        Its like a friggin movie title with these guys.

        ARod: History’s Greatest Monster
        He didn’t kill, but he was as bad as killers
        He didn’t maim, but he was as bad as . . . maimers? Sure. Maimers.
        He didn’t kidnap, but he was as bad as kidnappers

        KILL HIM!

        Jeez. The guy took drugs to play baseball better. Just like LOTS of other guys did. Some got punished and some didn’t . Calm the eff down and judge ‘em all the same. But John Wayne Gacey analogies? For the love of Dog, get some perspective. And a sedative.

    • Alex K - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:55 PM

      It’s one violation.

      Your entire hypothetical is apples to oranges because the value of 1 injection isn’t even in the same gallaxy of 1 life. Also, to my knowledge, the JDA doesn’t have language that discerns between cycles or individual injections.

      • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:28 PM

        Can you quote for me where I equated steroid use with a life? I used an analogy to show that not being caught for something right away does not absolve the act itself. Each use of steroids was a separate violation and the JDA says three violations and you are out.

      • Alex K - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:02 PM

        You didn’t directly equate the two, but if you are going to use an analogy that involves a serial killer then, no matter your intention, you are comparing whatever it is to a life.

        Even though I understand your logic I still don’t agree with it. In my opinion it’s draconian to try and implement punishment for each cycle because, at it’s core, drug use in baseball isn’t that big of a deal. It’s not ruining baseball any more than spitballs did.

    • brazcubas - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:02 PM

      If someone is charged with murder, they’re typically not also charged with attempted murder or conspiracy to commit murder, since it’s assumed that you have to commit the latter to achieve the former. What you describe with Wayne Gacy would be the same as A-Rod testing positive on 33 tests (11 lifetime bans!), so a completely different situation.

      The JDA considers a positive test a violation, not every time a player uses steroids, otherwise the appeals process would become an endless farce with MLB trying to prove the player caught has used more than three times (lifetime ban) and the player trying to prove they haven’t

      • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:38 PM

        Not correct on the JDA; it contemplates non-tested violations, which is the case here. The positive test is merely evidence of use, like a blood-alcohol test. You can be busted for DUI without blowing or giving blood, and you can violate the JDA without testing positive.

      • brazcubas - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:11 PM

        Obviously they’re not using positive tests, since they don’t have any, MLB can probably prove possession which is itself a violation, but that wasn’t my point.

        Just as it would be silly to claim three violations of a single positive test (Thinking about buying, buying, using), it’s silly to claim three violations the way Madden proposes. If MLB is going to go make that leap, they’re better off with what you suggested, proving A-Rod made three or more purchases from Biogenesis and then try to get a lifetime ban from that. They might have a better shot, though it would be sure to bring legal action from the union.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:33 PM

        But you can be charged with murder…and a weapons violation, robbery, criminal damage, criminal trespass…or whatever charges apply. Often these other charges are indeed pressed because, if the criminal walks on the murder charge, he can never be tried again on it….but you have other weapons in your back pocket. Often these other charges are only dropped in a plea deal. They need to come at A-Rod with as many charges as they can muster.

    • yashraba - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:05 PM

      Nobody takes a ped one time, its not one magical needle and you’re juiced. Its a series of needles/pills taken over a period of time. By your logic this would mean “habitual use” whether they did one cycle or twenty. So you want to use “testing positive” as an indication of multiple instances of ped use since they technically used several times. That’s good and fine if that’s the stance you want to take, but that means everyone who ever tested positive should have received the same lifetime ban as Arod is hypothetically facing. And since that’s clearly not the case I’d say Arod has a pretty good reason to fight the suspension

      • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:35 PM

        Testing positive is evidence of one use of steroids, unless they can determine from the sample how many times the drug was used. One use, one positive test, one violation, 50 games. Multiple uses over many years is one violation? That is crazy talk.

    • jwbiii - Jul 30, 2013 at 10:28 PM

      Let’s assume for the purposes of argument here that there are perfect records that show that a player used PEDs from this firm systematically for five years

      That would be quite the trick, since Biogenesis was only in business for nine months. But you would have had to have been paying attention or be smart enough to know how to use a search engine to know that.

  11. rbj1 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:17 PM

    Fortunately I’ll only go to the gallows once, for thinking about killing that @#%$&* driver who cut me off.

  12. amhendrick - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:20 PM

    Do the ‘seeking’ and ‘buying’ parts require some level of intent, such as that you intended to seek out something that was prohibited by the policy, and bought something knowing that it was prohibited? If so, then I think that’s a different offense the simply testing positive. You can test positive for a banned substance without actually intending to.

  13. jfk69 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:21 PM

    They are not going to go after Arod with the drug suspension rule They will pressure him with the CBA. He is an admitted user who has repeatedly claimed that he stopped years ago, The evidence stills needs to be put forth. Here is what his lawyers are now looking at.
    Aside from the drug agreement, there is no automatic stay for suspensions under baseball’s labor contract.
    Rodriguez could be punished under Article XII B of the Basic Agreement, which states: “Players may be disciplined for just cause for conduct that is materially detrimental or materially prejudicial to the best interests of baseball including, but not limited to, engaging in conduct in violation of federal, state or local law.”
    Meet the new Pete Rose.

  14. chadjones27 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:24 PM

    I think it’s more of MLB working backwards. Did he take steroids? Yes. Do we have proof? No. DAMN. Since he took steroids, he to at least possess them, right? Yes. Do we have proof? No. DAMN. Well, we think he took and possessed steroids, so that means he’d have to seek out drugs, right. Correct. Do we have proof? Maybe. … Suspend him!

    • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:29 PM

      Are you actually aware of what proof they have? Me either, but I do know it was enough to cause Braun to cave, you know, the guy who has shown a willingness to fight The Man to the end. Careful, you might be waaaay out over your skis on this one, Chief. Might be good to see what they’ve got so you don’t end up with egg on the face IF they’ve got the goods.

      • chadjones27 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:38 PM

        Oh sorry, I wasn’t trying to state that I have inside knowledge of anything going on here. None of us do. Hence, the “I think” part of it. And my dumb description of events is just as plausible at this time as any other scheme we’ve seen.
        When I read this blog post, I couldn’t help but think of Monty Python’s Holy Grail, the witch scene.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:44 PM

        They must have the goods on him. It was clear he was on ‘roids in Texas (on a team with Canseco and Palmiero). He definitely made the move to HGH when testing for ‘roids was perfected, but there was still not test for HGH. He cheated as long as he could get away with it. Time to pay the piper A-Roid!

  15. banger60 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:26 PM

    you pus*ys want to talk about catholics, while you hide your real names, put your address out and let’s see you say it to a catholics face, I’ve got the money to come to you, THIS IS NO JOKE! Try me, this catholics hates fags, now it’s all making sense, butt master.

    • nategearhart - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:37 PM

      Yeah, you really took the teachings of Jesus Christ to heart.

    • kalinedrive - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:43 PM

      And what a fine representative of your religion you are.

    • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:44 PM

      Lighten up, Francis. Did you forget the part about turning the other cheek?

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:00 PM

        Themohel, I think you mis-understand (meaning you don’t understand) what turning the other cheek means. It means if someone attacks you, assaults you verbally or or physically….Jesus says if someone slaps you on the cheek…turn the other cheek to them also. “Turning the other cheek” does not in any way mean to ignore the sins of others, to turn and ignore it.The Catholic Church, though, does teach (it is in the Cathechism, you can look it up) that same-sex attraction, same-sex desire, is not a sin…as noted by Pope Francis recently.

      • raysfan1 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:43 PM

        No, themohel got his reference right–he was reminding banger to be more forgiving and to not be so easily offended, especially to the point of offering (I presume) a fight over the perceived insult.

    • jfk69 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:48 PM

      My son this Father O Tool. Now now remember when we had those private discussions about male body parts. I don’t want to have come over and put you over my knee again. Aggg The good times.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:10 PM

      What are you going to do about it internet tough guy/catholic bigot? I’ll show the religion some respect when they do something more about thirty plus years of raping young boys than just say, “oops, our bad, here’s some money now go away”.

  16. jfk69 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:29 PM

    Bill Madden must be a Catholic. Still carrying around all that guilt and nun speak thinking. Thanks Bill for clearing that all up.

  17. wpjohnson - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:35 PM

    This is ridiculous. Bud should either pee or get off the pot.

  18. intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:39 PM

    I think they have clear evidence that A-Rod had a history of seeking, buying and being administered. It not just a case of multiples on intent and desire, but on his history as a player, which they can prove, I assume, through the records. His denial, obstruction and tampering prove just how bad a character he is, so he should be dealt with harshly!

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:11 PM

      His denial, obstruction and tampering prove just how bad a character he is, so he should be dealt with harshly!

      Obstruction and tampering are the same thing, of which we’ve seen zero proof of.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:42 PM

        Obstruction can mean simply lying…tampering means playing with physical evidence, influencing witnesses…etc. They are not simply the same. It has been strongly implied that they have evidence of him trying to obtain and buy (assumed intent to destroy) the physical records…

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:51 PM

        It has been strongly implied that they have evidence of him trying to obtain and buy (assumed intent to destroy) the physical records…

        We have one week of news reports citing “sources” saying he tried to buy the documents. We have zero proof he did buy them. We have Arod’s team saying they never bought them or tried to buy them. And we have a guy who’s providing documents who wanted to sell them to MLB for $1M.

        This’ll get laughed out of an arbitration panel hearing, so we should really stop using this as if it definitely happened.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:00 PM

        Uh…no…the evidence still exists (if it exists)…so even if they can’t prove he tried to buy the records (maybe they can), they still have the records, which I don’t believe they will be able to laugh away. As others have done here, I point you to Ryan Braun caving in and confessing….

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:54 PM

        they still have the records

        Of course they do, but that has zero bearing on whether Arod tried to buy them or not. Far too many people are commenting as if it’s an ironclad fact he did. It’s a he said/he said situation of scumbags, so you better have more proof than “the guy who tried to extort MLB for $1M is going to testify that Arod tried to buy docs from him too”.

  19. nategearhart - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:41 PM

    I STILL don’t understand why MLB is this worked up over ARod, compared to how other PED users have been treated. What makes his transgressions so much worse? Is it the contract?

    • themohel - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:47 PM

      If true, I would guess the attempts to interfere with the investigation might have them a little hot under the collar. I hope we find out what is true and what isn’t at some point.

      • nategearhart - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:54 PM

        Thanks for the reply. I also hope we get more information, because I’m just having a hard time getting behind the amount of punishment this guy seems to be facing in comparison to his peers.

    • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:06 PM

      A-Rod tampered with the investigation….

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:11 PM

        [citation needed]

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:44 PM

        [citation forthcoming]….

  20. banger60 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:55 PM

    kalinedrive, I didn’t start this, it least I’ve got the balls to stick up for my religion, these blogs have nothing to do with religion, keep it out, you dumbass, I would suppose your a phoney ads christian, they usually have big pie holes, enough said!

    • nategearhart - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:08 PM

      If Jesus Christ exists, I have a feeling he doesn’t like you.

      • raysfan1 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:53 PM

        On the contrary, Jesus loves everyone. I’m certain he is not happy with violence and insults in His “defense” however.

        Banger–Please, there are better ways to defend your faith. As for offering threats and insults to those who attack Christianity and Jesus’ viewpoint about it, I refer you to Matthew 26:51-52.

    • cur68 - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:41 PM

      Dude, could you calm down? Just a hair? I think you might be a touch too sensitive for the interwebs.

  21. misterj167 - Jul 30, 2013 at 3:59 PM

    Anybody who thinks the owners are incapable of lying or fabricating evidence to make an example of a star player is only fooling themselves. I’m not saying this is the case with A-Rod, I’m saying they wouldn’t hesitate to do anything they felt they could get away with in order to regain the power they lost when they lost the reserve clause.

    I’m hardly A-Rod’s biggest fan but if you’re going to force a player out of baseball just because he’s a/an (insert your own expletive here), nearly every owner in the league should be forced to give up their teams.

    About the only good thing I can say about Selig is that he’s still not as bad as David Stern.

    I have nothing good to say about the knee-jerk reactionaries who clearly hate ball players. The people whose water you’re carrying are laughing at you.

    • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:05 PM

      I think it far more likely that owners would lie or destroy evidence to protect their star players than try to destroy them. Clearly, though, the Yankees are pissed at A-Rod…but they should have realized that the years of ‘roid abuse would destroy his body…as it has. They just needed to sign him to a much shorter contract. Buyer beware!

      • misterj167 - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:18 PM

        It’s not A-Rod’s fault the Yankees gave him such a stupid contract

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:04 PM

        He represented himself as a guy who could give them 50-60 homers a year. But either the Yankees were too stupid to realize he was heavily juiced, or they were stupid enough to give that contract to such a heavy, chronic abuser without thought he would either get caught or completely breakdown. Either way….stupid Yankeees….

  22. phreakin - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:46 PM

    A-Rod should be glad it’s MLB leading this ad not the local, state, or federal government. Because if he’s truly done what the leaks are saying, like trying to buy the evidence, that last thing he should have been worried about is being suspended. What he’s doing now is illegal and I think that’s part of the reason MLB is still suing the clinic. To put additional and continued pressure on Bosch and to allow additional charges to be brough against anyone tampering with the clinic’s documents and records.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:54 PM

      What he’s doing now is illegal and I think that’s part of the reason MLB is still suing the clinic.

      Outside of taking PEDs, which are illegal, he’s been blackmailed by the guy with documents and, supposedly, lied about what he’s done. Two of those are “illegal”, but only one was done by Arod. He’d get probation and a fine if he was tried in a court of law instead of this absurdity run by MLB.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:07 PM

        …but if it was you at your job, there’d be a penalty for flagrant violations of the rules, lying, cheating…etc. Maybe even getting fired. So, you are saying there should be no penalty from MLB?

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:59 PM

        but if it was you at your job

        This isn’t me at my job. I work in an “at will” state. I can be fired at any time, for any reason, with or without cause.

        things I cannot do at my job which aren’t an issue with MLB. I cannot throw an object at a coworker without facing criminal charges. I can’t try to run a coworker over because he blocks my path to the bathroom without facing criminal charges. I can’t smash a watercooler with a baseball bat because I don’t like the presentation that my boss just gave. I can’t get drunk at work because I’m not expected to produce anything that day.

        Let’s knock it off with the “real world” comparisons. They aren’t even apples and oranges, it’s apples and grenades.

        So, you are saying there should be no penalty from MLB?

        Good lord can we get some reading comprehension classes in here. I clearly said “outside of taking PEDs, which are illegal”. That means I’m telling you he already broke one rule. Now tell me where he broke more rules.

        I don’t think there should be any additional penalty from MLB because they did the same stuff they accuse him of (buying documents) and the lying about it is absolute horseshit. Every player lies to the commissioner when they are suspended “I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to throw this object right at a player’s head that I called out 12 hours earlier for being a showboat. It slipped, honest!”

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 31, 2013 at 2:20 PM

        “Let’s knock it off with the “real world” comparisons. They aren’t even apples and oranges, it’s apples and grenades.”
        Actually, it is the real world. You and everyone else need to stop pretending that this people aren’t living and working in the real world. That’s a big part of the problem. Real world rules are for everyone.

    • yashraba - Jul 30, 2013 at 5:20 PM

      How is it illegal for Arod to try and buy the evidence but legal for MLB to try and buy the evidence? I am honestly curious as this confuses me. MLB has no legal authority so weren’t they doing essentially the same thing?

      • phreakin - Jul 31, 2013 at 1:42 PM

        Because if it was say the FBI running the investigation and he tried to buy the evidence before the FBI could see it it would be obstruction of justice.

  23. chiadam - Jul 30, 2013 at 4:59 PM

    he should have thrown the evidence in a lake.
    – Aaron Hernandez

  24. dwdive - Jul 30, 2013 at 6:46 PM

    This story is nonsense. MLB doesn;t have to use ridiculous logic to count multiple violations for AROID. He’s tested positive before, he’s been ties to multiple scandles like this one, and they obviously have records of him using over years and years that he’s been in the league. He’s been using PED’s since High School, there was even a book written about it. If they are serious and the 3 strikes your banned for life rule is legit, he could possibly be looking at a life-time ban. With that said, it couldn’t happen to a nicer guy…

    • bigharold - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:05 PM

      ” He’s tested positive before, …”

      Technically no, he hasn’t. Regardless of you opinion of A-Rod, assuming it’s determined that he used, .. this is his first offense.

      And, had MLB did what they said they’d do with the results of the 2003 “survey ” nobody would even know about that. Now, MLB is trying to break the rules to hammer A-Rod for breaking the rule. See how much cooperation the union offers going forward.

      • intergrowth2013 - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:44 PM

        “.. this is his first offense.” If they records and evidence show otherwise, and it seems they will, it won’t matter for him. “First offense”…hah…here’s another serial killer analogy (to play off the outrage of the previous one above)…if a killer kills 100 people and is only caught for one, though evidence and circumstances strongly indicates he was responsible for many,many…do you go easy because of his first offense? If the evidence if there, he is toast.

  25. courageousdeer - Jul 30, 2013 at 7:52 PM

    Anyone see this latest interview with Victor Conte of BALCO fame? He’s not very impressed with MLB’s testing process:

    http://blog.sfgate.com/ostler/2013/07/28/juicing-villainhero-blasts-mlb-again/

    If what Conte says is true, MLB is continuing to perform PED theater, instead of making their best efforts to catch PED users. And trying to go after A-Rod with a Basic Agreement violation instead of going through the JDA process smells more and more like a witch hunt.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Cubs shore up rotation with Jon Lester
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. W. Myers (3950)
  2. M. Kemp (3610)
  3. M. Cabrera (3373)
  4. M. Morse (2528)
  5. J. Kang (2318)
  1. J. Lester (2265)
  2. C. Headley (2167)
  3. J. Upton (2107)
  4. M. Scherzer (1831)
  5. A. Rios (1802)