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MLBPA believes Selig “has not acted appropriately under the Basic Agreement” in suspending A-Rod

Aug 5, 2013, 3:47 PM EST

Michael Weiner, head of the MLBPA, has issued a statement. Short version: we’re cool with the 50-game suspensions, but the league has gone too far with A-Rod:

The accepted suspensions announced today are consistent with the punishments set forth in the Joint Drug Agreement, and were arrived at only after hours of intense negotiations between the bargaining parties, the players and their representatives.

For the player appealing, Alex Rodriguez, we agree with his decision to fight his suspension. We believe that the Commissioner has not acted appropriately under the Basic Agreement. Mr. Rodriguez knows that the Union, consistent with its history, will defend his rights vigorously.

The Union’s members have made it clear that they want a clean game. They support efforts to discipline players, and harshly, to help ensure an even playing field for all. The players support the Union’s efforts to uphold the JDA while at the same time guaranteeing that players receive the due process rights and confidentiality protections granted under the agreement.

Lastly, I want to close by stating our profound disappointment in the way individuals granted access to private and privileged information felt compelled to share that information publicly. The manner in which confidential information was so freely exchanged is not only a threat to the success and credibility of our jointly administered program; it calls into question the level of trust required to administer such a program. It is our view that when the bargaining parties hold their annual review of the program, we must revisit the JDA’s confidentiality provisions and consider implementing stricter rules for any breach by any individual involved in the process.

Hard to disagree with any of that. Of course, given that Weiner is on record seeming to go along with MLB’s view that Biogenesis suspensions do not have to conform to the JDA’s discipline guidelines, it’s kind of rich to hear this from him now.

 

  1. joerevs300 - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:02 PM

    “The Union’s members have made it clear that they want a clean game. They support efforts to discipline players, and harshly, to help ensure an even playing field for all. The players support the Union’s efforts to uphold the JDA while at the same time guaranteeing that players receive the due process rights and confidentiality protections granted under the agreement.”

    LOL, fewer, bigger lies have ever been put into print by an MLBPA rep.

    No, if you REALLY wanted a clean game, it would be a LIFETIME ban, first offense. Period.

    Until then, it’s “Oh, I’m sorry I got caught doing that. I’ll cool my heels for 50 games, while I drive my Bugatti, live in my $1M home, and sleep on my other hundreds of thousands of dollars I have lying around”.

    • Kevin S. - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:42 PM

      You probably think the death penalty reduces crime rates, too.

      • albertmn - Aug 5, 2013 at 8:50 PM

        It may or may not reduce crime, but if it were actually enforced, it would clear up some room in the nation’s prison system. Giving the death penalty and then taking a decade to enforce it is ridiculous. Of course, it enforced more quickly, maybe it would affect crime rates….

      • ramrene - Aug 5, 2013 at 9:17 PM

        I don’t know, what’s the crime rate in China where they’ll cane you for spitting on the street. Over there they execute the highest number of people annually yet their crime statistics are significantly lower than the US. Coincidence or cause and effect?

  2. jollyjoker2 - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:06 PM

    we want a clean game but feel free to cheat and don’t tell anyone about suspensions or disclose protected health information …….WTF.

    • Walk - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:56 PM

      Reading comprehension for the loss.

      “we want a clean game but feel free to cheat and don’t tell anyone about suspensions or disclose protected health information …….WTF.”

      False positives and lab mistakes do happen. Other mistakes do happen.They are extremely rare. If a players name is leaked prior to his hearing or appeal even if he is found innocent he will be punished. He can likely lose votes on any awards and he will lose money on any contract he signs. The union is not asking for nondisclosure. They are asking for the due process negotiated in good faith. They simply want a players name and information withheld until he is found guilty then it can be disseminated. How would you like to lose half your income because of a mistake even though you were proven to be innocent? By all means continue to believe whatever you wish despite the facts. Cherry picking the stats is easiest way to show bias. I believe these guys are foolish at best and scumbags at worst but they are due their duly negotiated rights. This has become a case where the cure is rivaling the disease in its stench.

  3. sleepyirv - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:17 PM

    It’s just like middle school- the weird kid who thinks he’s a minotaur gets picked on because no one is willing to stand up for him.

  4. chc4 - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:27 PM

    So here’s another examples of why unions are so wonderful:

    http://freebeacon.com/teamsters-ordered-to-stop-picketing-funeral-homes/

    • raysfan1 - Aug 5, 2013 at 8:53 PM

      …and employers never take advantage of employees either:

      http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/25/opinion/americas-sweatshop-diplomacy.html?_r=0

      In other words, abuses happen both ways, because the existence of power-hungry, greedy jerks is unfortunately part of human nature. On the other hand, as a manager, I’ve had the privilege of working with unions in a very helpful, non adversarial way…the secret was including their leaders on the decision-making committees in a meaningful way.

  5. nhstateline - Aug 5, 2013 at 6:38 PM

    Wait until he wins in arbitration, something I am pretty sure he will. I have no real opinion on Arod one way or the other but this strikes me as 1) mlb trying to do damage control and 2) the Yankees trying to dump a whole bunch of a bad contract. Problem for both of them is that what they agreed to with the union covers all of their players including this one. This isn’t decades ago when baseball suspended Ty Cobb for a long time because it was convenient for the Commissioner and an owner.

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