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Someone impersonated Shane Spencer on the radio, claimed to have “dabbled” in steroids

Aug 14, 2013, 9:14 AM EDT

Shane Spencer

The biggest question I have in all of this is, of all of the people you could impersonate, why would you impersonate Shane Spencer?

Anyway, someone pretended to be Spencer, called into an Albany, NY radio station and claimed to have “dabbled” in steroid use.  The real Spencer heard about it and set the record straight. The radio station issued this statement:

“Yesterday we ran an interview we thought was with Shane Spencer. Unfortunately, after the interview was aired, we learned that the interview was with an impostor. During the interview, the Spencer impostor said that he used performance enhancing drugs and accused other players of doing the same while pretending to be Spencer. The real interview was scheduled to take place in advance and was set-up through the official Major League Baseball Players Association.

The real Shane Spencer agreed to come on the air and conduct an interview setting the record straight. We here at 104.5 The Team ESPN Radio thank Shane for coming on the air and clarifying this unfortunate situation. We, along with Shane, share the opinion that such criminal actions are not funny, have no sense of purpose, are bad for the individuals involved, and are bad for baseball as well as radio in general.”

Is it really “criminal” to call in to a radio station and pretend to be someone else? Unless you’re gaining something from it or trying to actually defraud someone I think it just falls under the category of “dumb prank.” But we live in a time where a lot of things that used to just be dumb pranks are now considered criminal so maybe I’m living in the past.

Anyway: if this is legal, I feel like Kevin Maas and Charlie Hayes should probably be extremely cautious over the next several weeks. Just to be safe.

  1. unclemosesgreen - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:23 AM

    In New York the caller could be charged with criminal impersonation. Law states it is criminal impersonation when a person: “[i]mpersonates another and does an act in such assumed character with intent to obtain a benefit or to injure or defraud another”(N.Y. Penal Law § 190.25 [McK-inney 1996]

    It’s really meant for identity theft and illegal check cashing and such but an angry prosecutor could press the charge based on the intent being to “injure” Shane Spencer’s reputation.

    • unclemosesgreen - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:25 AM

      I wonder if “steroids” could sue for the guy using Shane Spencer as an example of performance “enhancement”.

      • thinkfirstthenspeak - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:39 AM

        Spencer did slug .910 in 1998. I’d say that was successful dabbling.

        Small Sample Sizes be damned.

      • mississippimusicman - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:11 AM

        Shane Spencer “dabbled” in performance.

    • ptfu - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:53 AM

      Couldn’t it be considered defamation as well?

    • eatitfanboy - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:42 AM

      Everything is illegal in New York.

      • mybrunoblog - Aug 14, 2013 at 1:52 PM

        Everything except smoking pot and gay marriage. After that your right, everything else is illegal. And heavily taxed too.

    • jfk69 - Aug 14, 2013 at 11:05 AM

      Does Keyser Söze count?

    • bigharold - Aug 14, 2013 at 12:17 PM

      “… but an angry prosecutor could press the charge based on the intent being to “injure” …”

      If so, how did the “Jerky Boys” avoid life sentences?

  2. blacksables - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:37 AM

    “We here at 104.5 The Team”

    Is it now the law that every friggin’ frequency have it’s own name?

    • historiophiliac - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:48 AM

      Yes, otherwise you couldn’t tell the 104.5′s apart.

      • blacksables - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:00 AM

        As some one who worked radio communications in the Army for 20 years, I’m here to tell you, it can be done. If the NSA can do it, the average citizen can.

      • historiophiliac - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:01 AM

        Unpossible.

      • dondada10 - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:13 AM

        Me fail English?

      • historiophiliac - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:18 AM

        And you can to!

  3. eatitfanboy - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:47 AM

    The answer to your first question is obvious: No one knows what Shane Spencer sounds like. Be honest, if you had to close your eyes and imagine Shane Spencer’s voice in your head, could you? And if some bizarre reason you can, because you like listening to 15 year old baseball interviews in your spare time or something, you do acknowledge that the vast majority of the population could not, right?

    • blacksables - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:07 AM

      “Be honest, if you had to close your eyes and imagine Shane Spencer’s voice in your head, could you?”

      Nothing personal, but please don’t stand next to me during the apocalypse. That scares me.

      • eatitfanboy - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:33 AM

        No problem, dude. When the apocalypse comes, I also hope not to be in the company of other guys who like posting on sports blogs.

        But I’m not sure what you’re reading into my relatively simple point that the guy probably chose to impersonate someone like Spencer because he knew that most people would not remember what he sounded like.

    • kevinbnyc - Aug 14, 2013 at 1:17 PM

      Moron, you’re posting on a sports blog.

      Also, thanks for providing a douchy response to a rhetorical question.

      • blacksables - Aug 14, 2013 at 4:08 PM

        Thanks for playing.

      • eatitfanboy - Aug 14, 2013 at 4:49 PM

        I’m glad most people can see who the moron is.

      • eatitfanboy - Aug 14, 2013 at 4:53 PM

        …and obviously have a much better sense of humor than you and your boy blacksables

  4. deadeyedesign23 - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:52 AM

    “Of all the names he could pick, why settle on Jon Voight?”

    “Don’t you see, that’s the genius of it. If he had said Liam Neeson, you’d know he’s making it up.”

  5. jfk69 - Aug 14, 2013 at 9:56 AM

    Why not…On many teams I see some ball players impersonating real ball players every day.

  6. jfk69 - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:03 AM

    Rusty Staub called in to note…My ribs come from pure grain fed cattle. Steroid and hormone free. All you ball players come on down. You won’t fail a test at Rusty’s Ribs

  7. dirtyharry1971 - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:10 AM

    the bluejays have been impersonating a mlb team this season

  8. jfk69 - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:10 AM

    I tried calling in as Horace Clark claiming I once played for the Yankees and it was called The Horace Clark Era…They asked if this was a Superman joke. Then hung up.
    I am surprised this station was hood winked

    • Glenn - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:23 AM

      I made my Horace Clarke reference (below) before reading your comment just now. Maybe something is in the air.

  9. dondada10 - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:16 AM

    I once went on a cruise and told me I was Omir Santos. Shockingly, nobody gave a fuck that I was Omir Santos.

  10. Glenn - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:22 AM

    I’ve got a killer Horace Clarke impersonation that I break out whenever I can. I feel for the Shane Spencer guy. It’s tough in the impersonation niche market business.

  11. jfk69 - Aug 14, 2013 at 10:59 AM

    I also tried calling in as Mike Kekich. They knew I was Peterson right away. i think the dog barking in the background gave it away.

  12. jfk69 - Aug 14, 2013 at 11:04 AM

    That does it…I am calling in as Keyser Söze. They will take this call. This is just not one of your usual suspects

  13. nobody78 - Aug 14, 2013 at 11:24 AM

    I don’t understand the station’s statement. They said the “real interview” was set up in advance with the MLBPA — but apparently, Spencer didn’t know anything about it, since he was told about the on-air interview by friends. If the MLBPA set it up, how did the fake Shane Spencer know when and where to call in?

    (PLEASE don’t read a conspiracy theory into this. I just find the statement confusing.)

  14. yahmule - Aug 14, 2013 at 11:37 AM

    Kind of surprised they fell for it since the dude kept shouting “Baba Booey!” during the entire call.

  15. ladyatthebat - Aug 14, 2013 at 1:38 PM

    “The real interview was scheduled to take place in advance and was set-up through the official Major League Baseball Players Association.”

    How can that be? Shane Spencer was a replacement player. As such, he was never a member of the Players Association.

    • yankeefan1950 - Aug 14, 2013 at 4:42 PM

      You are so right, I’d forgotten that others besides Kevin Millar were scabs during the last player’s strike.

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