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Please stop: Major League Baseball can’t go after the ACES agency

Aug 16, 2013, 3:03 PM EDT

Sam Seth Levinson Getty Images

The Daily News is the latest to take someone’s — likely competing agents’ — talking points about the Levinson Brothers’ ACES agency in the wake of the Biogenesis scandal and suggest that Major League Baseball might be able to do something to discipline them. You’ll recall that most of the players implicated in Biogenesis are or were represented by ACES.

We’ve dealt with that several times in the past and the answer on this is simple: Major League Baseball has no jurisdiction over agents. The Players Association does. They’ve already reviewed ACES, reprimanded them and that is that. Maybe they went light — that’s a matter of opinion — but there is nothing the league can do.

So this suggestion from the Daily News story is great:

The Players Association certifies and regulates agents, but sources told the Daily News that Selig isn’t powerless if he feels the union has not properly disciplined rogue player reps. The commissioner could direct the clubs to not deal with dirty agents.

That’s collusion, of course. And it’s illegal. And if they did that they would be sued so fast their heads would swim.

You know what would be cool? If, instead of talking up stuff that makes Major League Baseball seem so tough and proactive about PEDs, people actually talked up stuff that could actually be legally feasible or remotely reasonable.  I guess until that happens we get source-stroking stories about impossible and impractical things.

  1. jcmeyer10 - Aug 16, 2013 at 3:10 PM

    Someone has their bathrobe tied a bit too tight today!

  2. chip56 - Aug 16, 2013 at 3:20 PM

    I’m just curious, on average how much time do you spend looking for stories so that you can write another 500 words about how people are blowing the steroid stuff out of proportion?

    • jcmeyer10 - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:31 PM

      The irony of Craiggers Conquest only grows.

      • chip56 - Aug 16, 2013 at 11:34 PM

        He’s like the scrawny guy in a bar fight standing behind his friends yelling “hold me back hold me back”

  3. chip56 - Aug 16, 2013 at 3:21 PM

    Because at this point, really the only one who gives a crap is you.

    • clemente2 - Aug 16, 2013 at 3:23 PM

      You are an idiot

      • chip56 - Aug 16, 2013 at 3:29 PM

        Honestly – Craig writes about 15 columns a day about how people are blowing steroid use out of proportion and making too big a deal out of it.

        Seems to me the only one talking all the time about steroids is Craig.

      • jcmeyer10 - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:31 PM

        I’m pretty sure he’s even forgotten he’s a huge Braves fan at this point. He’s lost his identity.

      • Old Gator - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:40 PM

        Chip, if you really think he’s the “only one” talking steroids these days you must have a very flexible spine. How else could you have fit your head so far up your ass?

  4. blabidibla - Aug 16, 2013 at 3:31 PM

    They will be punished enough is my guess. Clean players won’t want to be associated with them, and dirty players won’t want to fall under suspicion by signing with an agency known to harbor cheats. I have no numbers, so this is all assumptive, but I think it’s a pretty good guess.

  5. polonelmeagrejr - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:06 PM

    Write about whatever you want; just no moer lazy video. If I want to see talking heads I’ll wacth Rosenthal or Jon Heyman

  6. myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:16 PM

    If, instead of talking up stuff that makes Major League Baseball seem so tough and proactive about PEDs, people actually talked up stuff that could actually be legally feasible or remotely reasonable. I guess until that happens we get source-stroking stories about impossible and impractical things.

    ——————————————————————–

    Craig, please explain to me how you equate this impossible and not legally feasible, which you are 100% correct about, with being impractical and not remotely reasonable, which you are so far off 1st base, you’re damn near 3rd. The fact that something can’t be done is hardly an arguement for it not being a good idea. Keep spewing your love for all things PED.

    • nategearhart - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:20 PM

      “The fact that something can’t be done is hardly an arguement for it not being a good idea”

      Do people even listen to themselves?

      • myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:24 PM

        Why don’t you explain to me where this statement is incorrect, then?

      • nategearhart - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:35 PM

        Your whole comment is rife with contradiction. You concede that a thing is impossible, but then scoff at its being impractical and unreasonable in the same sentence. That’s ridiculous. Can you name any other act at all that is impossible, yet trying it could be considered practical and reasonable? No; attempting an act that is impossible is void of reason and practicality by definition.
        But you’ve reasoned that Craig’s pointing this out means he’s a PED lover, whatever the hell that means. Weird.

      • myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 8:42 PM

        Here’s the deal people. Craig is correct it is impossible because it is against the rules. That doesn’t mean the rule isn’t bad, or that it’s not a good idea to change it. Hence there IS no contradiction in my statement. Sheesh!

      • myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 8:44 PM

        P.S. Craig is a self admitted PED apologist. Haven’t been around this site long, have you.

        “Alex Rodriguez has, like, 47 people on the planet in his corner. It’s me, a few other like-minded PED apologists, his kids, some friends, his lawyer and a handful of ballplayers, I figure.”

      • nategearhart - Aug 19, 2013 at 9:18 AM

        Long enough to know when Craig is being sarcastic.

  7. barbeaux - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:21 PM

    How exactly is that collusion? Collusion would be if some of the agent agencies got together and decided they’d charge a low rate to get all the players and wait until the other agencies die off before they raise their rates really high. They can block a service provider if that provider is shady.

    • myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:23 PM

      Sorry, but Craig is 100% correct. Two or more teams getting together and discussing ANYTHING of this nature is the definition of collusion.

      • barbeaux - Aug 16, 2013 at 5:26 PM

        Let me clarify. Collusion is not always illegal. The MLBPA has a rule that agents have its certification to be an agent. Isn’t that in effect collusion since they’ve discussed and agreed that only certified agents can be agents with which they’ll work? The answer is yes, but it’s not illegal because it’s not attempting to divide its own market. Oil refineries discussing and planning a strategy for taking refineries offline a certain percent so as to lower supply and increase prices is illegal collusion. Different car companies meeting to plot how to destroy another car company is illegal collusion. A group of companies decided not to work with a certain supplier for whatever reason is not collusion. For example, a clothing company in the Far East had horrible working conditions. The National Retail Federation members decide to stop working with that company. That’s not illegal collusion.

      • myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 8:49 PM

        A group of companies decided not to work with a certain supplier for whatever reason is not collusion. For example, a clothing company in the Far East had horrible working conditions. The National Retail Federation members decide to stop working with that company. That’s not illegal collusion.

        ————————————————————————————–

        Except for the fact that the contract would not be be collectively bargained.

      • barbeaux - Aug 17, 2013 at 1:03 AM

        Collective bargaining…isn’t that collusion? The MLB nor the MLBPA would not be doing anything illegal if they no longer wanted to work with Aces. Could MLB say that any players ripped by dirty agents can’t play? That probably would float in court given the circumstances.

      • badintent - Aug 17, 2013 at 1:08 AM

        OK . lets get Ted Nugent and the late great Mr. Heston on their take about gun control in Chicago.Or lack THERE OF.

  8. chiadam - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:27 PM

    Collusion is when owners decide in secret not to bid on or sign a player or players. Does that extend to player agents? I don’t know how it does. If the agents are not subject to the disciplinary process set up in the CBA, why are they protected by the collusion part of it? Can they pick and chose which parts of the CBA they get to use?

    • myopinionisrighterthanyours - Aug 16, 2013 at 8:46 PM

      If you refuse to sign a player represented by someone, you are colluding against the player by extension just because of who would be negotiating his contract. I don’t agree with Craig often, but he is spot on with that argument.

      • barbeaux - Aug 17, 2013 at 1:07 AM

        Nope. If an agent isn’t certified by the MLBPA then he can’t negotiate a player’s contract. It’s explicitly written in the rules.

  9. myhawks1976 - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:28 PM

    I just figured it out. Craig was a young rf prospect in the Brewers organization back in the early 80s, when Bud still owned them. Bud wad walking through the locker room at spring training looking for a dirty pair of Robin Younts undergarments to sniff and came across Craig and his syringe full of anabolic pleasures. Bud immediately cut him and black listed him from the game.

    it all makes sense now.

    • nategearhart - Aug 16, 2013 at 4:58 PM

      Yeah man, baseball teams should totally commit collusion, and anyone that doesn’t think so is a steroid addict with a vendetta.

      • myhawks1976 - Aug 16, 2013 at 6:53 PM

        It was tongue in cheek. Humor. You know, the “hahaha” thing. Sheeesh. Tough room.

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