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Philadelphia Daily News columnist Marcus Hayes accuses Ken Griffey Jr. of using PEDs

Aug 22, 2013, 2:32 PM EDT

Flying Ken Griffey

Ken Griffey Jr. is usually held up as the one slugging superstar from the 90s who did it clean. He may have. We don’t know. Nor do we know that the guys who are accused of it were dirty. But despite all of that uncertainty, there has always been a sense that accusing Griffey of taking PEDs — if anyone ever dared — would be a major, major escalation in the PED wars.

Philadelphia Daily News columnist Marcus Hayes escalated last night.

He was in a long Twitter war with Ryan Lawrence of the Philadelphia Daily News about who was better — Ichiro or Griffey. The entire exchange is play-by-played over at Crossing Broad.  Setting aside the fact that only a dunderhead would say that Ichiro was a better overall player than Griffey, Hayes kept couching his argument about Griffey’s decline years as his “post-PED years.” Lawrence let it go a couple of times, maybe incredulous about what he was reading. But he finally called Hayes on it:

source:

Hayes never backed down after that, which leaves him on record as saying that Ken Griffey Jr. was a PED user. Because of “catastrophic dropoff and soft-tissue injuries.” I’ve not gone back and looked but I’m guessing Hayes has also accused people of being on the juice specifically because they never dropped off and stayed healthy even as they aged.

Of course that’s the beauty of a witch hunt. You don’t need actual evidence or even coherence. People are already so riled up that evidence and anti-evidence are one and the same.

Anyway, good to know someone who actually works for a mainstream media outlet is on record accusing Ken Griffey Jr. of juicing. I never thought we’d get there, but here we are.

 

Note: this post originally identified Hayes as a “Philly.com” columnist. He is not. He is a columnist for the Philadelphia Daily News. Apologies for the error.

  1. offseasonblues - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:25 PM

    If you read Kapler’s article you should be aware that banned substances do different things to and for different players. Some gain mass, some don’t. It’s also quite possible that a series of career shortening injuries was caused by banned substance use for one player, while banned substance use extended the career of another player.

    Being accused without anything but circumstantial evidence is the price players are paying for Selig and Fehr, and the media raking in the money banned substance use was generating. It sucks, but the players who shared the riches are going to have to live with it, innocent or not.

    • brazcubas - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:46 PM

      Except becoming more injury-prone as you age hardly qualifies as circumstantial evidence.

      If he had continued playing the outfield aggressively in his thirties and avoided any significant time in the DL, that might be worth an eyebrow raise (and nothing more), but his body simply did what bodies do when they age, that alone can’t reasonably be used as evidence of PED use.

    • bleedgreen - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:54 PM

      Where was Barry Bond’s injuries, or Roger Clemens, or anyone else really. Sure, they got hurt just like everyone else, but from what I understand, none of it was chronic with those two particular guys. It just so happens that when some people age, their bodies break down differently.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:36 PM

        Only seriously intrested people will be warmly welcomed

        This sounds like the beginnings of a cult. Are you associated with the Heaven’s Gate people, by chance?

      • heyblueyoustink - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:43 PM

        Is there another comet coming?

        The spelling and grammar is a little better than this morning’s effort.

      • moosebreathmints - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:49 PM

        He Bonds was smart, he knew what were the banned steroids and substances. Baseball did not check him for what he was taking. The results of the steroid was: 1- muscle mass build-up, 2. Head size increased. He had to go to a bigger hat size. 4- Mood swings. 5- This one is very damning to him: the cartilage in his knees got thicker making it hard for him to walk let alone run. It was the leg bone mass increase that slowed him down.

        Besides – his career got better the older he became. Players at his age begin to decline in the production. His took off and went off the charts!

        In March, 2006 the book Game of Shadows, written by Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada, was released amid a storm of media publicity including the cover of Sports Illustrated.[153] Initially small excerpts of the book were released by the authors in the issue of Sports Illustrated. The book alleges Bonds used stanozolol and a host of other steroids, and is perhaps most responsible for the change in public opinion regarding Bonds’ steroid use.[154][155]
        The book contained excerpts of grand jury testimony that is supposed to be sealed and confidential by law. The authors have been steadfast in their refusal to divulge their sources[156] and at one point faced jail time.[157] On February 14, 2007, Troy Ellerman, one of Victor Conte’s lawyers, pled guilty to leaking grand jury testimony. Through the plea agreement, he will spend two and a half years in jail.[144]

      • moosebreathmints - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:52 PM

        Bonds was smart, he knew what were the banned steroids and substances. Baseball did not check him for what he was taking. The results of the steroid was: 1- muscle mass build-up, 2. Head size increased. He had to go to a bigger hat size. 4- Mood swings. 5- This one is very damning to him: the cartilage in his knees got thicker making it hard for him to walk let alone run. It was the leg bone mass increase that slowed him down.

        Besides – his career got better the older he became. Players at his age begin to decline in the production. His took off and went off the charts!

        In March, 2006 the book Game of Shadows, written by Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada, was released amid a storm of media publicity including the cover of Sports Illustrated.[153] Initially small excerpts of the book were released by the authors in the issue of Sports Illustrated. The book alleges Bonds used stanozolol and a host of other steroids, and is perhaps most responsible for the change in public opinion regarding Bonds’ steroid use.[154][155]
        The book contained excerpts of grand jury testimony that is supposed to be sealed and confidential by law. The authors have been steadfast in their refusal to divulge their sources[156] and at one point faced jail time.[157] On February 14, 2007, Troy Ellerman, one of Victor Conte’s lawyers, pled guilty to leaking grand jury testimony. Through the plea agreement, he will spend two and a half years in jail.[144]

    • bowltr - Aug 22, 2013 at 7:22 PM

      Offseason, Don’t blame Selig or Fehr for the steroids, blame the people who’s fault it really is……………..the players themselves. Did Selig or Fehr stick needles in the players ass and shoot them up? No the players made a conscious decision to do PED’s. It’s amazing to me that people can’t lay the blame where it truly belongs, that you want to give them a pass. It’s THEIR fault nobody else’s.

      • djpostl - Aug 23, 2013 at 3:04 PM

        Yes. But if you REALLY think the league and the players union (as well as the owners, coaches, other players and journalists) didn’t know what was going but turned a blind eye as revenues exploded then you’re dumber than a bag of rocks.

        Now everyone wants to absolve themselves of it and point the finger just at the players.

        Pre-2003 EVERYONE should shoulder the blame. It was a group effort done in the name of chasing the almighty dollar.

        Post-2003 it is on the players and the players alone imo.

  2. flyinhighwithvick - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:27 PM

    Marcus Hayes is a class A scumbag!

    • aceshigh11 - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:20 PM

      Wow does one go about receiving a Class A license in scumbaggery? Is there a licensing agency where one would go to get certified?

      I’m inquiring on behalf of dirtyharry1971.

      • greymares - Aug 22, 2013 at 5:53 PM

        It comes automatically when was is employed as a writer, t.v. or radio personality or blogger. It depends on what level you choose to use it.

      • cur68 - Aug 22, 2013 at 7:23 PM

        I thought it was common knowledge that dirtyharry1971 majored in “Douchebaggery” not “scumbaggery”? Scumbaggery is his minor, hence his criminal record.

  3. psuorioles - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:31 PM

    A few years ago, I had the opportunity to have a one-on-one conversation with a pitching coach in MLB, while he lived in the building my wife managed. PED’s were brought up and he said people inside baseball knew who the juicers were and who weren’t… I asked him specifically about Griffey and Pujols and he said absolutely not to both, which was a big relief to me…

  4. jerze2387 - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:32 PM

    Dear Marcus Hayes,

    Eat a dick. Hack.

    -Signed, a kid who grew up watching Griffey play the game the right way, and even when everybody else was juicing, let the injuries derail his career by NOT juicing to keep from injuring his integrity. that word, intergrity, look it up, because you clearly have none.

    • dnc6 - Aug 22, 2013 at 5:22 PM

      Hayes may or may not be a hack, but you’re falling into the same problem that the Costases of the world do. The hero of your boyhood must be clean and the one true superstar to hold above all others. You have no idea whether Griffey juiced or not.

  5. cohnjusack - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:43 PM

    So, declining in your early 30s and becoming injury ridden is now proof of steroid use, eh?

    No one tell Frank Thomas that.
    Or Jimmie Foxx
    or basically every other player who ever played baseball.

  6. notoriousbri - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:43 PM

    how does Marcus explain his weight gain? living in the philly area, I used to see this turd on Comcast sportsnet all the time. He loves to hear himself talk and always wants to take the contrary or unpopular opinion in a effort to be edgy. He is like a bloated homeless version of Skip Bayless

  7. jayquintana - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:56 PM

    This is the price all players will pay for not having drug testing for so many years. Frankly, the clean players should’ve asserted themselves at the beginning of the steroids era. The fact that every player of that era is suspect is, well, tough cookies.

    • cohnjusack - Aug 22, 2013 at 3:59 PM

      That’s the spirit! Condemn them all as cheaters because some guys did!

      Seeing as drug use is currently at an all-time high in America, I can only assume you wrote this post while hepped up on goofballs. If not…well, tough cookies.

  8. praetorian12 - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:05 PM

    Do not feed the trolls… even if they are “mainstream” media hacks.

    I will not go to philly.com to blast him and “reward” his asinine comments with web hits.

    Griffey played on concrete at the Kingdome for 10 years. He never worked out… was never in the gym… even though fans wished he would. Juicing? Puh-leeze. Dude was the Natural. He would not disrespect his father, the Big Red Machine, and all the players he grew up around my taking PEDs.

  9. dans761 - Aug 22, 2013 at 4:36 PM

    Griffey did things the right way! In the midst of all that darkness when all the “great” players were getting caught with steroids, Griffey was the 1 super star who’s name NEVER came up!! ANY MLB fan can appreciate that! You don’t have to be a Reds or Mariners fan to appreciate Griffey playing baseball the way baseball should be played!

  10. Carl Hancock - Aug 22, 2013 at 9:53 PM

    As much as I’d love to believe Griffey played clean, nothing would surprise me anymore. But I still hope that he did.

  11. vicvega422 - Aug 22, 2013 at 10:23 PM

    Marcus Hayeshas been and always will be, a joke

  12. mustbechris - Aug 22, 2013 at 11:13 PM

    I just want to make clear in the STRONGEST POSSIBLE TERMS that the only – singular, only – person in Philadelphia who likes and respects and reads and trusts Marcus Hayes is Marcus Hayes.

    His views do not reflect ours as a whole, neither on this topic nor on any other topic. He’s a generally smug and insufferable human being who is wrong about everything and we really can’t fathom how he is employed by the Daily News at all, let alone for as long as he’s been.

    • coloradogolfcoupons - Aug 23, 2013 at 12:29 PM

      @mustbechris

      ” really can’t fathom how he is employed by the Daily News at all, let alone for as long as he’s been.”

      It’s simple. He has a picture of the owner of the Daily News, reading a copy of the “Camel Sutra”…which Hayes had sent him after memorizing it.

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