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Dan Uggla rejoins the Braves after Lasik eye surgery

Aug 28, 2013, 3:15 PM EDT

Dan Uggla AP AP

Dan Uggla is back from the disabled list 15 days after undergoing Lasik eye surgery to correct vision problems that plagued him all season.

Before the surgery Uggla hit .186 with a league-high 146 strikeouts and was basically helpless after the All-Star break with a .133 batting average and 30 strikeouts in 24 games. He played two minor-league rehab games at Triple-A after the surgery, going 2-for-7 with a homer and four strikeouts. So … who knows.

It’ll be hard for Uggla to hit any worse than he did before the surgery or be less productive than fill-in Elliot Johnson.

  1. scoutsaysweitersisabust - Aug 28, 2013 at 3:41 PM

    As someone who’s had Lasik eye surgery, I can attest to the dramatic improvement it can make. (I never understood how people could read the spin on a ball by the seams before). But I am curious as to why he was on the 15 day DL. I was good to go after 3 days.

    • jm91rs - Aug 28, 2013 at 3:56 PM

      I agree. It’s amazing thing (until it wears off, then you’re screwed like I am), and I was back playing collegiate soccer 3 days later. I could see perfect after just one day. Why did he need to miss so many games?

      • Tarkus - Aug 28, 2013 at 6:03 PM

        I don’t think he needed to miss so many games. I think they put him on the DL because he was really struggling big time, and they wanted him to to take a break away from the game while also getting this done. Gives him a chance to come back not only with improved vision, but with a refreshed attitude.

      • Beef - Aug 31, 2013 at 1:50 PM

        I was good after a couple of days. I haven’t had to do any adjustments, but know people who have. Most doctors offer free adjustments. Mine does. This one is in Raleigh, NC: http://www.traverslasik.com

    • Walk - Aug 28, 2013 at 5:47 PM

      It is not the seams themselves you look for. If I saw a ball with a tight dot in the middle it was probably going to be a slider, smaller the dot the sharper the break. A curve looked to me like it was off center almost like ball was a bit lopsided. Four seamer to me looked like it was spinning backwards. My eyesight uncorrected is 20-500 but I correct back to 20-20 and I could recognize those pitches most times. I started having trouble though some where in the mid to upper 80’s. I looked up the rest of the pitches as mostly I never had to worry much about anything else since I never made it past jr college level.

      http://jecbaseballinfo.weebly.com/pitch-recognition.html

    • Walk - Aug 28, 2013 at 5:57 PM

      Hmm I made a rely but it seems to have disappeared, I will post again, please forgive me if I double post. I never made it past jr college. The three pitches I saw the most were fastball, slider, and the curve. I did not read the seams so much as look at the patter of the ball the seams appeared to make. A slider would have a tight dot in the middle, best sliders had the tightest, smallest dots, and were harder to see. A curve appeared to me to spin oddly, almost tumbling. A fastball looked to me like it spun backwards with a sideways u. My vision is poor uncorrected at 20-500 but corrects back to 20-20. I was able to pick those pitches out most time until the speeds hit mid 80’s and up. I only had to worry about those three pitches for the most part but I looked up the rest, bear in mind pitchers pitches look a bit different from each other due to velocity and downward movement from differing height on release points. Handy link I found that covers a few other pitches.

      http://jecbaseballinfo.weebly.com/pitch-recognition.html

    • dianadfbest - Aug 29, 2013 at 3:22 AM

      my classmate’s step-sister makes $78 every hour on the internet. She has been without a job for eight months but last month her check was $15553 just working on the internet for a few hours. next page… http://clck.ru/8oZLc

  2. auminer96 - Aug 28, 2013 at 4:50 PM

    I wonder why he had Lasik instead of PRK. I had PRK 18 months ago and my eye doctor told me it was the surgery of choice for professional athletes (and special forces guys) because it avoids a big risk of Lasik…that the flap can dislodge if the player takes any sort of blow to the eye or head. (My doctor told me about one of his patients whose baby hit her in the eye, dislodged the Lasik flap and nearly blinded her…only emergency surgery saved her sight in that eye!) PRK doesn’t cut a flap, instead it actually removes a portion of the cornea which then regenerates and the eye returns to full structural strength. I’m not a professional athlete by any means, but I am a structural engineer so I liked that aspect. But, I freely admit that the recovery time from PRK is SIGNIFICANTLY longer than for Lasik; it was a good month until I felt comfortable reading a computer screen, about 3 months until my vision had completely stabilized, and 12 months until the outer layer of the cornea completely regrows.

    • Tarkus - Aug 28, 2013 at 6:04 PM

      You answered your own question with your last sentence.

  3. liquidgrammar - Aug 28, 2013 at 8:50 PM

    Why didn’t Mr. Brave write this story?

  4. Walk - Aug 29, 2013 at 12:00 AM

    I have a bad habit of saying something and the opposite of whatever statement I make is the usual result. It got the braves announcers tonight though. They were just commenting on how well uggla is seeing that ball with uggla batting and having a 2 strike count. The very next pitch was so far outside that it would have been behind a left handed batter and uggla swung and missed it prompting the response from the announcers that they guessed he does not see that pitch so well.

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