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Major League Baseball issues a statement about the A-Rod lawsuit

Oct 4, 2013, 12:30 PM EDT

From MLB:

“For the more than four decades that we have had a collective bargaining relationship with the Major League Baseball Players Association, every player and club dispute has gone through the jointly agreed upon grievance process. This lawsuit is a clear violation of the confidentiality provisions of our drug program, and it is nothing more than a desperate attempt to circumvent the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

“While we vehemently deny the allegations in the complaint, none of those allegations is relevant to the real issue: whether Mr. Rodriguez violated the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program by using and possessing numerous forms of prohibited performance-enhancing substances, including Testosterone and human Growth Hormone, over the course of multiple years and whether he violated the Basic Agreement by attempting to cover-up his violations of the Program by engaging in a course of conduct intended to obstruct and frustrate the Office of the Commissioner’s investigation.”

Given past practice we will not hear much else from MLB on this.

If you believe A-Rod’s allegations, however, some of MLB’s position will show up in the form of leaks!

And don’t forget to tip your waitresses, guys.

 

  1. chip56 - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:36 PM

    It’s a great statement by MLB…essentially saying that even if MLB is now trying to end his career via suspension it doesn’t take away from the fact that the suspension is only possible because Alex cheated, lied and tried to cover up his actions.

  2. scoutsaysweitersisabust - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:39 PM

    Kind of like how MLB clearly violated the confidentially agreement in the handling of the entire bio-genesis case by leaking a massive amount of information in order to sway public opinion in their favor and poison the well. Kind of like how MLB clearly violated the collective bargaining agreement and the Joint Drug Agreement in suspending Alex Rodriguez over four times the amount of every other player in a thinly veiled attempt to save over thirty million dollars?

    • gerryb323 - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:43 PM

      Mom! He hit me!

      Nu-uh, he hit me!

    • chip56 - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:14 PM

      1. You don’t know that MLB was the source of the leaks. It makes no sense for MLB to jeopardize the suspensions and the fact that they were working with the Union in relative harmony by violating the JDA by leaking info.

      2. MLB didn’t violate the JDA by suspending Alex for 211 games – as was stipulated by the Union, the violations in the biogenesis case were not subject to the 50/100/150 scale.

      3. MLB doesn’t save any money by suspending Alex. Unless you are alleging that the league is in cahoots with the Yankees.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:21 PM

        1. You don’t know that MLB was the source of the leaks. It makes no sense for MLB to jeopardize the suspensions and the fact that they were working with the Union in relative harmony by violating the JDA by leaking info.

        Whether we can prove it or not doesn’t mean that MLB wasn’t the source. Also it makes a ton of sense for MLB to get the public on its’ side, especially if they know they can’t be caught leaking the info. It’s a win-win situation for them. [not saying this is what happened, but it's a possibility]

        2. MLB didn’t violate the JDA by suspending Alex for 211 games – as was stipulated by the Union, the violations in the biogenesis case were not subject to the 50/100/150 scale.

        He’s not suspended for 211 games, he’s suspended for the remainder of ’13, the ’13 playoffs, all of ’14 and the ’14 playoffs. It only works out to 211 games if the Yanks didn’t make the playoffs in either of those years, but if they do, it’s beyond 211 games (and the very definition of arbitrary).

      • chip56 - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:26 PM

        Point 2 – irrelevant. Ryan Braun accepted the same stipulation (all of the 13 season and postseason) making such a suspension precedent.

        Point 1 – There was no need. Miami Sun Times had the names and that was enough for MLB to have public support. Honestly the only party that benefits by leaking information in this case is the player. If the leaks are deemed as a violation of due process and presumed to come from MLB then the case could be thrown out on a technicality.

      • gerryb323 - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:09 PM

        1) I was think that the statement was ridiculously similar to some of the arguments in the lawsuit. That’s what I figured scout was reading as well.

        2) Those weren’t stipulations, more like an acknowledgement. And certainly not precedent.

        3) Yes

    • ilovegspot - Oct 4, 2013 at 3:29 PM

      scout is as delusional a aroid.

    • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Oct 4, 2013 at 3:57 PM

      Aww, that’s so cute! I have a fan!

  3. jarathen - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:40 PM

    I like lawsuits.

    A-Rod: You guys are bad!
    MLB: Nuh-uh, you are!

    • gerryb323 - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:49 PM

      I approve of the use of “Nuh-uh” here…great minds. Although, I think you spelt it better than I.

  4. Detroit Michael - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:40 PM

    Isn’t MLB essentially right? If A-Rod has a claim, it should be resolved under the collective bargaining agreement (presumably through arbitration), not a private lawsuit?

    • paperlions - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:10 PM

      Depends on the nature and ramifications of the violation. If they have violated his rights that are not covered by the CBA, then arbitration under the CBA can not resolve it. The claims that MLB’s witch hunt and repeated leaks have been designed to affect media coverage and public opinion and therefore his livelihood/endorsements, etc….those may not be covered under the CBA.

  5. manute - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:42 PM

    They didn’t just deny the allegations, they VEHEMENTLY denied them. You have to pay the lawyers a little extra for that.

    • gerryb323 - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:46 PM

      Your honor, we strenuously object!

      • sabatimus - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:42 PM

        Your honor, it’s become obvious that Mr. Rodriguez’s intentions this afternoon are to smear a high ranking MLB officer in the desperate hope that the mere appearance of impropriety will win him points with the court members. Now, it is my recommendation, sir, that Mr. Rodriguez be reprimanded for his conduct and that this witness be excused with the court’s deepest apologies.

      • gerryb323 - Oct 4, 2013 at 3:50 PM

        Commissioner Selig, did you order the code red?

    • historiophiliac - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:24 PM

      In my experience, the hyperbole is free.

  6. paint771 - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:44 PM

    That’s a little rich from MLB about A-Rod violating the sanctity of the collective bargaining agreement and the purity of the agreed-upon PED process provisions, given they essentially threw those out the door in A-Rod’s case and are rewriting them on the fly as they see fit.

  7. chiadam - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:47 PM

    “For the more than four decades…”

    great the statement statement, the idiots.

  8. tferr85 - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:49 PM

    “This lawsuit is a clear violation of the confidentiality provisions of our drug program…

    whether Mr. Rodriguez violated the Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program by using and possessing numerous forms of prohibited performance-enhancing substances, including Testosterone and human Growth Hormone”

    Looks like someone forgot to proof read.

    • anxovies - Oct 4, 2013 at 6:53 PM

      Proofreading costs extra.

    • righthandofjustice - Oct 4, 2013 at 7:51 PM

      Suing MLB and Selig is a violation of the MLB? Which rule? When has USA turned into a communist country?

  9. sdemp - Oct 4, 2013 at 12:55 PM

    And just like MLB leaked Braun’s failed test before allowing him to go through the appeals process.

    I’m not defending any player who cheats, but MLB has done more harm for the game than A-Rod or any other player could ever do.

    What a joke!!!

    • ilovegspot - Oct 4, 2013 at 3:33 PM

      How do you know braun didn’t leak the info to make MLB look bad because he was guilty and caught at the time

  10. mvp43 - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:06 PM

    This is great for the game.

    • sabatimus - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:50 PM

      You’re talking about hockey fights, right?

  11. Old Gator - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:10 PM

    I love this. But with the market’s insatiable thirst for ethanol, will there be enough of a crop this year to furnish the necessary amounts of popcorn?

    • gloccamorra - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:07 PM

      Great point. The people in Washington should be looking at emergency measures to import Brazilian ethanol to assure a healthy popcorn supply. We can’t depend on Mexico, they turn their corn crop into tortillas.

    • Gamera the Brave - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:24 PM

      Gator is correct. We need to completely abandon HBT, as the baseball playoffs are trivial in importance, relative to important topics like how Ethanol output affects popcorn levels, the new Core Curriculum (gotta bone up on that!), the Federal shutdown, etc.

      As so many posters noted yesterday, we have no business getting worked up in the LEAST about baseball, when there are IMPORTANT topics to discuss. If we rage, it must be to the exclusion of all else.

  12. chip56 - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:17 PM

    What’s great now is that MLB is saying that by filing this suit Alex has violated the CBA’s confidentiality clause which gives the league the right to now put everything they have about Alex on public display. Rodriguez’s camp very quickly got out in front of cameras to say “no no” we’re going forward with the CBA and not putting out any confidential information.

    This is what happens when you don’t think a lawsuit through…Alex really does not want what MLB has on him to become public knowledge.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:23 PM

      Why not? 99% of the public hates him, what’s he got to lose?

      • chip56 - Oct 4, 2013 at 1:28 PM

        Have you not watched or listened to Alex Rodriguez speak? He still believes he can salvage his reputation by winning this case. If the evidence against him becomes public then that’s it.

  13. erikeaglesfan1 - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:11 PM

    Isn’t this statement stating what he took both a violation of the CBA and the HIPAA privacy law?

    • sabatimus - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:53 PM

      Not sure. Seems like it ought to be yes, but minor leaguers every week get suspended for drugs, and the league most of the time discloses the drug. So perhaps such occurrences take precedence over HIPAA? (I don’t know how that could be possible)

  14. bluesoxbaseball - Oct 4, 2013 at 2:26 PM

    Craig, Why wasn’t it a breach of the agreement for MLB to publicly announce the A-Rod suspension before the arbitration process? I thought suspensions were confidential until after the issue was arbitrated. (The big deal w/ Braun’s “positive” test last year was that its existence leaked (no pun intended) prior to the arbitrator’s ruling.)

    • righthandofjustice - Oct 4, 2013 at 6:27 PM

      MLB violated the CBA by releasing the information to the public but A-Rod’s lawsuit against MLB and Selig consists of no information not already released to the public. A-Rod has all the rights to file a lawsuits against his rights, and for the good of the People. There is no way for MLB from stopping A-Rod and other players including but not limited to those implicated in the Biogenesis investigation to sue them and their partners of crime.

  15. stevem7 - Oct 4, 2013 at 6:00 PM

    Can there be anything more phony than MLB now calling for respecting the process? When it comes to Bud Selig the Indian said it best “White man speak with forked tongue”

  16. righthandofjustice - Oct 4, 2013 at 6:19 PM

    What an idiotic statement made by MLB! The CBA doesn’t protect any party involved from suing each other. The arbitration and hearing process is just an optional avenue of mediation. Even if it is only optional, A-Rod is willing to go through every step of it regardless.

    There is no rules in the CBA that protect MLB, the teams and Selig from getting sued. Besides, this case is going to be evolved into a full blown federal investigation anyway. Even if A-Rod didn’t sue Selig and MLB, I bet Uncle Sam will.

  17. jfk69 - Oct 4, 2013 at 7:40 PM

    He has nothing to lose and plenty of money gratis the idiot owners that over paid him.
    Couple that with his right to sue anybody he damn pleases. His lawyers,news hacks and players union could not be more than pleased. Alex the wild card and his lawyers will make this the new reserve clause fight with MLB.
    LETS GET READY TO RUMBBBBBBBBBBBLE

    • righthandofjustice - Oct 4, 2013 at 7:54 PM

      It won’t matter how much money A-Rod has and how much the lawyers will make because MLB and Selig will pay for it.

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