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A-Rod’s lawyers file a complaint with the arbitrator over a leak to the New York Times

Nov 4, 2013, 5:11 PM EDT

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The New York Times story we linked this morning reported that Alex Rodriguez tested positive for a stimulant in 2006. That information is not supposed to be released to anyone and, as such, A-Rod’s attorneys have filed a complaint with the arbitrator in the pending appeal of his 211-game suspension objecting to the disclosure.

For its part, Major League Baseball denies that it leaked it. This comment in the New York Daily News makes little sense, however:

It would seem unlikely that MLB would leak that information, according to a source familiar with the alleged positive test.

“All it would do,” said the source, “is make it look to the arbitrator like baseball is desperate to out Rodriguez. Why would they do that?”

How about: because baseball has fought the P.R. war just as hard as A-Rod has, and part of that P.R. war is in painting A-Rod as a long-term scofflaw of Major League Baseball’s drug rules? Indeed, just three freaking days ago, Rob Manfred said this:

“Mr. Rodriguez’s use of PEDs was longer and more pervasive than any other player . . . ”

If that’s your case — and it clearly is part of MLB’s case — why wouldn’t you leak stuff about A-Rod’s drug use being long and pervasive? It’s in complete lockstep with your theory. A theory which you have been trying to get out to the public for quite a while now.

  1. deaninajijic - Nov 4, 2013 at 5:34 PM

    Agreed!

  2. tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 5:46 PM

    “Judge, I would really prefer it if people stopped finding out about how often I have cheated. It really makes my case look bad.”

    • sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - Nov 4, 2013 at 6:12 PM

      Did you know that rules and laws only offer basic protection to people who are well liked? True story.

      • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 6:39 PM

        So the leaking of information about MLB’s involvement in question aspects of the investigation is ok?

      • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 6:39 PM

        *Questionable

      • cur68 - Nov 4, 2013 at 7:31 PM

        tfb: there is no confidentiality agreement around how information is gathered in this investigation but there IS one for MLB drug test results. Releasing how MLB got its information is actually legal. Spilling drug test results is not. I can’t stand either side of this fight, but damn, MLB sure seems to be in the wrong here.

      • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 7:51 PM

        I like the notion of protecting one type of wrongdoing but not another.

        I have no sympathy for A-Rod in any situation so it’s kind of hard to be indignant about procedural misconduct “slandering” him with the truth.

      • sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - Nov 6, 2013 at 10:48 AM

        “I have no sympathy for A-Rod in any situation…”

        This is what Bud and his brew were counting on. It is OK to disregard a person’s rights as long as nobody likes that person. Except MLB as the governing body needs to be held to a higher standard.

        In his zeal to improve his own image, Bud has managed to turn a simple steroids suspension into the equivalent of a civil rights case.

      • raysfan1 - Nov 4, 2013 at 8:16 PM

        Not sympathy for Rodriguez, but MLB violating the CBA and JDA makes it more likely Rodriguez skate/gets a much reduced suspension.

      • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 8:20 PM

        Whether it affects the outcome or not, I find it disingenuous for someone to exploit and cheat the flaws in a system for so long, and then crow when the other part doesn’t follow the rules of the system.

      • johnchesterny - Nov 5, 2013 at 11:13 AM

        “Not sympathy for Rodriguez, but MLB violating the CBA and JDA makes it more likely Rodriguez skate/gets a much reduced suspension.”

        Exactly the reason why the leaks may be coming from Team A-Roid.

      • ilovegspot - Nov 5, 2013 at 1:21 PM

        Obvious to anyone with IQ above 100, Aroids creapy lawyers leaked this info.

  3. ilovegspot - Nov 4, 2013 at 5:51 PM

    Aroid sordid group released this info because it was bound to get out eventually and it could make MLB look bad to the arbitrator. These suckers think its PR, it for the arbitrator.

  4. raysfan1 - Nov 4, 2013 at 6:23 PM

    As I said on the earlier Rodriguez post–I favor serial slappings for all involved on both sides. Start with the lawyers. Make it happen, Mr Arbitrator, Sir!

    • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 7:26 PM

      A-Rod agrees with your proposal.

      • raysfan1 - Nov 4, 2013 at 8:13 PM

        Revision: face slappings

      • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 8:14 PM

        A-Rod disagrees with this revision.

      • Kevin S. - Nov 4, 2013 at 8:18 PM

        Oh, you mean that time Varitek bravely went after another guy while wearing body armor? Easy to shove a guy’s face when yours is safe.

      • tfbuckfutter - Nov 4, 2013 at 8:54 PM

        I’m pretty sure his face would have been safe with or without the mask on.

        You know, aside from possibly having to face legal action or something.

  5. bigharold - Nov 4, 2013 at 7:53 PM

    “How about: because baseball has fought the P.R. war just as hard as A-Rod has,…”

    I think MLB actually started the PR war. They’ve leaked so much to NYDN since this started I’m surprised that A-Rod is just now filing a complaint. I’m not saying Bill Madden and that sanctimonious runt Lupica are on MLB’s payroll but MLB will likely owe them a 1098 tax statement for this year.

    • sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - Nov 6, 2013 at 10:54 AM

      The funniest part was MLB getting an injunction to prevent ARod from publicly discussing the case. What are they afraid of? Should Tacopina have gone through Matt Lauer instead?

      Again, MLB needs to be the grown up in a player dispute. MLB has failed miserably in that regard.

  6. happytwinsfan - Nov 4, 2013 at 10:25 PM

    how sad.

    the blossoming rival to honus wagner as the best shortstop in the century and a half of baseball history is purchased by the yankees, who at the time happening to already have the second to best short stop in baseball, convert him to third base.

    since then and perhaps before it appears more likely then not, that like many others, he availed himself of the use of outlawed PEDs and instead of crowning a career achievement,ala henry aaron, with several relatively productive but not certainly not great final seasons, is embroiled in a legalistic PR word game of who did or didn’t violate this or that confidentiality agreement and who has been the most despicable in their ruthless gathering of legal / PR soundbites.

  7. Old Gator - Nov 4, 2013 at 10:27 PM

    If MLB were a boat, its leaks would have sent it to the bottom of the Hudson Canyon by now. That being said, how many boats have you seen leaking from the top down anyway?

    • happytwinsfan - Nov 4, 2013 at 10:37 PM

      guess your’e right. but when it’s said that baseball must be a great game because “they” keep trying to kill it and can’t, i still wish “they” would quit trying so hard.

  8. dlf9 - Nov 5, 2013 at 8:51 AM

    It would seem unlikely that MLB would leak that information, according to a source familiar with the alleged positive test.

    The irony in this statement is amazing. Either this ‘source’ was him/herself leaking information by providing the information that they are familiar with the alleged positive test or s/he was the recipient of leaks. I guess that it could be coming from a testing lab, but they too are covered by the confidentiality provisions.

    • ilovegspot - Nov 5, 2013 at 1:23 PM

      Ariod lawyers leaked it knowing it would come out eventually. It a covert attack on MLB. Nice and slimey.

  9. joestemme - Nov 5, 2013 at 2:47 PM

    A-Roid can go Fu#K himself and his complaints.

  10. joergen12 - Nov 6, 2013 at 7:18 AM

    A-Rod is the worst guy ever. Nuf said

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