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Report: Alex Rodriguez has discussed accepting a reduced suspension

Jan 9, 2014, 6:20 PM EDT

Alex Rodriguez AP AP

The Baseball Hall of Fame vote is over and done with, but at least we still have the continuing saga of Alex Rodriguez to talk about.

With arbitrator Fredric Horowitz expected to making a ruling on Alex Rodriguez’s 211-game suspension any day now — in fact, a decision could come down as soon as tomorrow — Wallace Matthews of ESPN New York hears from a source “in A-Rod’s camp” that the embattled slugger has discussed the possibility of accepting a reduced suspension rather than continue his fight against MLB in court:

According to the source, a suspension longer than 100 games will likely cause Rodriguez and his attorneys to pursue a temporary restraining order against Horowitz’s ruling in federal court.

If he is given a shorter suspension, however, “then Alex will have some things to think about,” the source told ESPNNewYork.com.

According to the source, who has been privy to some internal discussions in the Rodriguez camp, the player is weighing the financial implications of continuing to fight this battle versus accepting a suspension that will allow him to take the field sometime in the second half of the coming season.

Taking his battle into the courtroom will cost Rodriguez “at least $10 million, with no guarantee of winning,” said the source, while a 100-game ban would cost him $15,425,000 of his scheduled $25 million salary for 2014.

This is quite a contrast to what we heard from Rodriguez after he stormed out of his arbitration hearing back in November, as he vowed that he “shouldn’t have to serve one inning.” However, the heavy cost of continuing the fight with no guarantee of victory apparently has him reconsidering things.

“It’s not just a matter of money,” the source told Matthews. “It’s also about the mental anguish of going through this and not knowing if or when you’re going to play again. Alex might decide to take his medicine and move on.”

  1. scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:25 PM

    He should accept a shorter suspension. 50 games. That’s the limit of what would properly be imposed on him via the JDA. Again, the issue here was never really over his guilt, but the fact that MLB decided to hand down a punishment over 4 times that of anyone else for the same offense because they wanted to pursue some messed up witch hunt.

    • Caught Looking - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:54 PM

      No way MLB settles for anything less than 65 games that Braun served and that’s being generous.

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:00 PM

        And there’s no way Alex should accept anything more than 50. The JDA is very clear on this issue, and I’m still at a loss as to understanding any confusion on the issue.

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:06 PM

        In addition, Braun was a fool for accepting 65 but likely decided the extra 15 games wasn’t worth the fight or the risk of getting hit by more. (Which I can completely understand).

    • ilovegspot - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:30 PM

      What you idiots fail to understand is that there is extensive proof of extensive drug use over many many years and he tried to obstruct the investigation into his drug use.

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:34 PM

        And what YOU fail to understand is obstruction is not against any rule in the JDA or CBA and thus is not a punishable offense. And that is due to a lack of foresight by MLB.

        In addition, there is NO provision for how long or how often a player used banned substances, only for the times they have been caught. Do you HONESTLY believe all of the the others caught with steroids only did so once? Leave your personal bias at the door.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:58 PM

        What you idiots fail to understand is that there is extensive proof of extensive drug use over many many years

        The JDA clearly states that you cannot punish an offender for a second offense prior to notification of a first offense. So even if they had a 10 year history of him doing PEDs, he can only be punished for 50 games since this is his first notification.

      • paperlions - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:59 PM

        How long he used is completely irrelevant. The way the JDA is structured, the first time you are caught you get 50 games, this isn’t a court of law where you can stack counts in a trial.

      • braunliesandcheats - Jan 10, 2014 at 9:30 AM

        What most AROD supporters do not want to talk about is the CRIMINAL actions by AROD. Illegal possession and use of drugs without a prescription!

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 10, 2014 at 9:37 AM

        Alex was not the only one to engage in criminal behavior. MLB does not want to open that door.

    • unclemosesgreen - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:58 PM

      Braun had other reasons to accept his fate, to wit, the Brewers had already fallen out of contention and he would rather have the suspension over with in order to begin next season on time, when they will be ready to compete again.

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:00 PM

        Good point, thanks!

      • unclemosesgreen - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:02 PM

        That’s why I’m here. Incidentally. I agree with most everything else you have to say here.

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:19 PM

        Thanks! I really try very hard to be rational and reasonable. And I try to be man enough to admit when I’m wrong, and generally prefer to engage in adult, discussions, listening to all sides. But I can’t stand ignorance or intolerance. I’m a self admitted Orioles fan, and certainly can’t stand Alex and his antics, but at the end of the day, rules are rules and MLB is not above the rules they set for themselves.

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jan 9, 2014 at 9:14 PM

        But I can’t stand ignorance or intolerance. I’m a self admitted Orioles fan, and certainly can’t stand Alex and his antics, but at the end of the day, rules are rules and MLB is not above the rules they set for themselves.

        Yes, let the anger flow thru you. Come join the Yankees…err dark side…

      • Old Gator - Jan 10, 2014 at 8:04 AM

        He’s an Orioles fan. He doesn’t understand the power of the dark side.

      • unclemosesgreen - Jan 10, 2014 at 8:07 AM

        He ought to, he’s been watching Peter Angelos for long enough.

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 10, 2014 at 9:43 AM

        @Church Stay away from my sister!

        http://www.starwars.com/watch/episode_6_dark_side_beckons.html

        And yes, Peter Angelos has caused the hate to flow through me.

      • nyhammerhead - Jan 11, 2014 at 2:16 AM

        You make a great case. However, Arodless is being steered by some bellicose criminal lawyers in some bad advice. He should have hired professional industry mediators/negotiators to guide him in this situation.his lawyers remind me of Bruce Kutler defending Gotti. LOL

    • pjmarn6 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:44 PM

      Rodriguez is a multimillionaire, probably worth more than Selig, as if that matters. Everyone in this mess is guilty. As my father once said, how many toilets can you use at one time?
      Rodriquez is not going to get into the hall of fame. He deliberately waited a month before having the operation so “IF” he could get back for opening day, he would not be in condition to play.
      Now MLB has to pay its lawyers for going after Rodriguez. If Rodriguez has to pay his lawyers $10 Million, probably MLB has to pay the same to their lawyers.
      It appears each day that Rodriguez is more egotistical and more psychotic. Best thing for him is to talk again with Warren Buffet and tend to his millions. Remember that famous picture of Rodriguez huddling with Warren Buffer on the infield grass of Yankee Stadium? He’s not hurting for $$$.
      He is too self absorbed to take a suspension for what it means, “DON’T DO IT AGAIN!”

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:55 PM

        I completely agree that everyone involved in this mess is guilty. That includes MLB which, to use a very technical term, did some VERY hinky, possibly illegal things during their investigation.

        I don’t agree that Rogriguez is worth more than Selig. Remember, Selig is a former owner and while Alex has certainly made a lot of money over his career, Bud has made enough to purchase and run a MLB franchise.

        This is by no means scientific, or conclusive, but see the following links. As you did bring up a very interesting topic.

        http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-athletes/richest-baseball/bud-selig-net-worth/

        http://www.celebritynetworth.com/richest-athletes/richest-baseball/alex-rodriguez-net-worth/

      • nyhammerhead - Jan 11, 2014 at 2:21 AM

        Right now Warren wouldn’t come within 20 miles of Arodless.Warren long distanced himself from this cockroach. Money doesn’t buy class or brains.When Arod is broke he can sign autographs at Swap and Shops.Right next to Allen Iverson

    • chip56 - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:04 PM

      Michael Weiner himself said that the 50/100/150 scale did not apply to those players caught up in Biogenesis. That’s why MLB is able to go for more than 50 on Alex and got Braun to settle at 65

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:40 PM

        Show me where in the JDA (Which Alex and the rest of the Biogenesis players were suspended under) it says any player could be suspended for anything other than 50/100/150. Please provide me with proof that 50/100/150 does not apply to anyone, at any time, according to the rules set out by JDA.

        http://mlb.mlb.com/pa/pdf/jda.pdf

        http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/07/16/weiner-the-50-100-lifetime-suspension-rules-dont-apply-to-biogenesis/

        I have linked the JDA and the referenced comments by Weiner, who has provided zero evidence to back up his statement. As far as I am concerned, he is quite simply wrong in this instance.

        Just cause is referenced in the CBA, not the JDA, and when suspended MLB specifically referenced the provisions in the JDA which is a separate agreement.

    • bobdira - Jan 10, 2014 at 7:49 AM

      The rules you site don’t relate to intentionally interfering with an investigation by subverting evidence. There is no “rule” for that behavior which is the basis for the unprecedented punishment. The others were punished for using. A-Rod’s punishment was for behavior well beyond using and is justified in being unprecedented because that behavior is unprecedented. It’s beyond reprehensible. He represents the worst of the worst in the sleezy side of baseball.

      • Old Gator - Jan 10, 2014 at 8:05 AM

        He represents Bud Lite and the owners???

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 10, 2014 at 9:40 AM

        That’s my point exactly though. There is no rule governing his behavior. You can’t punish someone for breaking a rule that does not exist.

    • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 10, 2014 at 9:47 AM

      I love how many people are downvoting me in this thread. For all the negativity being thrown my way, no one has yet to provide me with any actual proof that Alex should have been given the punishment he was given. It’s all facts vs emotion and personal bias at play here. Look, I hate Alex just like the rest of us, but I believe in rules, and I believe in following the rules that were set forth, and I believe that one entity is not above the law. It is not right to make up the rules as you go along. That is not how a civil society behaves. If this was any player other than Alex Rodriguez, I really don’t think people would be as passionate on the issue as they are. It’s quite fascinating frankly.

      • dubj9 - Jan 10, 2014 at 10:14 AM

        man, i enjoyed your comments. my biggest problem w/ this whole situation, is i dont understand how mlb and the teams didnt know that these guys were using. i played sports, not on this level, but nothing happened w/out a coach knowing or suspecting and asking. i find it hard to believe, that all these guys were using and not one person in one organization had any idea that this was going on? i think the whole thing is a travesty. the teams profited off these guys taking peds and then once it was out to the public they threw them under the bus. the whole thing is a sham to me. from the team owners to the training staff to the coaches, to the sports writers. everyone knew, eveyone enjoyed and everyone profited. i think the biggest crock is punishing these guys, like they had nothing to do with it. its insulting to me as a fan

      • beachnbaseball - Jan 10, 2014 at 11:04 AM

        “Thanks! I really try very hard to be rational and reasonable. And I try to be man enough to admit when I’m wrong, and generally prefer to engage in adult, discussions, listening to all sides. But I can’t stand ignorance or intolerance. I’m a self admitted Orioles fan, and certainly can’t stand Alex and his antics, but at the end of the day, rules are rules and MLB is not above the rules they set for themselves.”

        Really, dude? How about you get over yourself! We’re all so glad you grace us with your Nobel prize winning posts and that you try so hard to be rational and reasonable. You also maintain a high standard against ignorance and intolerance.

        Good grief. You’re a regular knight in shining armor!

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 10, 2014 at 12:33 PM

        Thanks beachnbaseball for taking the time out of your very busy day to be a jerk to someone over the internet. Heaven forbid I take 15 seconds to write up one post trying to explain where I am coming from in this debate. Good thing you are there to put me down.

  2. uyf1950 - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:25 PM

    About the ESPN piece on A-Rod and his suspension. All anyone needs to know about the accuracy of that article is it was written by Wallace Matthew based on an anonymous source. I believe he is the same ESPN reporter that Brian Cashman told not that long ago that he (Brian) was tired of answering “stupid” questions.

    • 18thstreet - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:18 PM

      I would guess that this is A-Rod’s camp floating a trial balloon, and knowing that Matthews would print it.

      • uyf1950 - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:29 PM

        Just my opinion but I can’t see MLB accepting anything less then a 100 game suspension as part of any negotiation because to accept less would make them seem like they went through all of this for nothing and their only goal was to go after A-Rod because of some vendetta. As for a-Rod I can’t see him accepting anything more then 65 games because to admit to a suspension of more then that would be admitting guilt which he has denied from day one. Also anything more then a 65 game suspension and it probably pays for him to fight it monetarily.

      • sportsfan18 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:05 PM

        Both sides are supposed to accept whatever the arbitrator rules.

        So why would people say MLB would not ACCEPT less than a 100 game ban?

        Alex and his attorneys say they’ll take it to court if it’s a long suspension, but courts rarely let cases like this in, when both sides agreed to arbitration.

        Both baseball and Alex could be upset with what the arbitrator decides.

        Not that it matters I know, but I would be upset if a court heard or changed whatever the arbitrator rules in this case, regardless of what MLB and Alex’s camp say or do.

        People above were right to say that the JDA doesn’t allow for punishment of a 2nd offense without the first offense.

        Also, the JDA allows for arbitration and neither side should be able to go to a court to have the arbitrators ruling set aside.

        MLB, Alex and his attorney’s may act like idiots but I hope the courts tell them all to take a hike.

      • uyf1950 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:19 PM

        @ sportsfan, who is saying “So why would people say MLB would not ACCEPT less than a 100 game ban?”

        My comment was a reference to private negotiations between A-Rod and MLB unrelated to the decision and before any decision the arbitrator may make.

      • sportsfan18 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:50 PM

        uyf1950

        Well ma’am or sir, I’ll use YOUR own words and they are as follows:

        “Just my opinion but I can’t see MLB accepting anything less then a 100 game suspension as part of any negotiation because to accept less would make them seem like they went through all of this for nothing…”

        So, in YOUR own opinion, YOU can’t see MLB accepting anything less than a 100 game suspension.

        You also then stated your opinion on what Arod should not ACCEPT.

        It isn’t for MLB or Arod to decide what to accept. Each of their sides agreed to arbitration and while nothing is set in stone, I can’t see a judge changing what the arbitrator rules in this instance.

        I mean sir, when you use words like “just my opinion” and “I can’t see MLB accepting anything less…”

        Well… you did say MLB shouldn’t accept less than a 100 game ban.

      • uyf1950 - Jan 9, 2014 at 9:28 PM

        @ sportsfan, my comment was in regard to a negotiation between MLB and A-Rod not the arbitrator.

        So believe what you want and what you think I was saying. But you’re wrong in your interpretation of my comment.

  3. sportsfan69 - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:35 PM

    A-Rod,

    Is nothing more than a cheat. Who should be banned from baseball. Charlie Hustle at least played the game hard and fairly. Pete was banned for his managerial mis-deeds. A-Rod is nothing more than a two-bite cheat.

    • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:02 PM

      Charlie was banned for betting on baseball, and most still believe he bet against his own team and likely threw games as a result. But yea, you’re right. The guy who took steroids is MUCH worse.

      • Kevin S. - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:13 PM

        One of Charlie’s closest associates was a steroid dealer. Are we really supposed to believe that the guy who would do *anything* to win didn’t consider that avenue?

      • scoutsaysweitersisabust - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:17 PM

        Charlie once ran over a guy at the plate. He’s a real man’s man and therefore exempt from any steroid allegation. Or didn’t you get the memo?

      • nyhammerhead - Jan 11, 2014 at 2:25 AM

        Pete’s present girlfriend took roids , HGH and milk baths. Guilty as charged

    • sportsfan18 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:13 PM

      You DO realize that there are MANY other cheats in the game of baseball right?

      Arod isn’t nice or likable etc… He deserves to be suspended but to have his suspension according to the agreed upon rules between MLB and the union.

      Bud for almost two decades sat back and allowed PED use.

      After the strike in 1994, Bud was happy with the attention afterwards, ESPECIALLY in the summer of 1998 when Mark and Sammy Sosa were waging their assault on the single season home run record.

      BUD, others in his office, owners, managers etc… KNEW the players were using PEDS.

      Bud happily took the money from the growth in the game due in part to all of this.

      A few years ago, Bud’s salary was $18 million. His salary was equal to the combined salaries of the NFL, NBA and Hockey commissioners a few seasons ago.

      So, is Arod guility? Of course he is! Many others cheated and many others looked the other way from Bud on down.

      Did Arod get more money from cheating? Yes he did. Did baseball, Bud, the owners get more money from all the PED use? Yes they did. And they knew what was going on with the PED use and they knew the PED use was generating a lot more revenue for them.

      Bud didn’t get tough on PED use until very recently.

      Bud’s net worth is $385 million dollars.

      He’s rich enough and old enough to finally get tough on PEDS.

      He’s now worried about his legacy. That is why he’s doing this now. He ALREADY has his money and he’s at the end of hie reign.

      It is never as simple as one person or one things.

      This is a complicated interwoven web.

  4. mornelithe - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:42 PM

    Let him accept the 50-game ban, then slap him with conduct detrimental to, with a lifetime ban (which doesn’t allow players to play while appealing).

    • clemente2 - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:56 PM

      The handling of PEDs is bargained for under the CBA, and by law MLB needs to abide by it. As this issue is covered under the Joint Drug Agreement, MLB cannot lawfully decide to create its own procedures and penalties. Whether the arbitrator will have the nads to rule that way, I do not know—prior arbitrators have been pretty stand up.

      I assume the lesser penalty discussions mentioned above are because both sides are not entirely confident of the result.

      • mornelithe - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:19 PM

        I’m not talking about the PED’s use, I’m talking about the behavior he’s alleged to have undertaken in the attempted cover-up of said use. Trying to purchase evidence, witness intimidation, pointing other players towards Biogenesis, if this stuff is in fact true, that’s not exactly the message I want to be sending to kids, if I’m MLB.

        Then again, MLB’s done a considerable amount that I wouldn’t view as good for baseball either, not sure how you’d penalize them. Maybe get rid of Selig, would that be enough??

      • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:35 PM

        that’s not exactly the message I want to be sending to kids, if I’m MLB.

        Nah they’d prefer you to come celebrate the wife beater (Cox) and the drunk driver (LaRussa) during their HoF celebrations.

      • grumpyoleman - Jan 10, 2014 at 11:14 AM

        yeah look at all those poor kids growing up idolizing managers

    • sportsfan18 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:20 PM

      hey, Arod is a snake, not likable, he cheated etc…

      Conduct detrimental to the game? Bud and those in his office, owners, managers etc… KNEW of players PED use for the better part of two decades at least.

      After the strike season in 1994, BUD was happy with the offensive explosion in the game.

      Bud especially loved the summer of 1998 when Big Mac and Sammy Sosa were assaulting the single season home run record.

      Baseball was a hot thing that summer. Even NON-fans cared about their home run chase.

      It was appointment viewing.

      TV stations cut in to show their at bats. Those who didn’t like or care for baseball were aware of these two players.

      Bud and the owners were raking in the dough.

      A few years ago Bud’s salary was $18 million, which at that time was equal to the combined commissioner salaries of the NFL, NBA and the NHL.

      Bud’s net worth is $385 million.

      Bud and the owners KNEW the players were using PEDS and they KNEW that the PEDS were helping the ratings and bringing in the bucks for them.

      Bud only got serious about PEDS recently as he’s now thinking of his legacy as he’s close to retiring.

      MANY players cheated. I’m NOT apologizing for AROD. he’s guilty, deserves a suspension.

      But don’t think that Bud and baseball are squeaky clean either.

      • mornelithe - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:24 PM

        Come on, do I really have to say ‘Two wrongs don’t make a right?’ So, just because MLB did some shady crap, that means A-Rod should get off lightly? If the things he’s alleged to have done as I stated above are true, drug abuse aside, I wouldn’t want that anywhere near my league. But that’s just me.

        And yes, you’re absolutely right, there has to be some repercussions against MLB here, for any devious crap they’ve pulled. Unfortunately, how do you force a punishment on MLB?

      • sportsfan18 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:55 PM

        So you want one, who is JUST as wrong as Arod is to suspend Arod for conduct detrimental to the game?

        Since you yourself said that two wrongs don’t make a right, then why can’t Arod suspend Bud for conduct detrimental to the game?

        Yes, I know players don’t have that power.

        But others besides players are just as able to commit wrong doings to the game.

        When it is the commissioner? Tough luck to the players.

        Arod IS guilty. Deserves to be punished.

        Bud? Why didn’t he go after many other players this way years ago?

        Since you admitted both are wrong and that MLB did shady things, why are you advocating that one of the two guilty parties further punish the other guilty party?

        Goose for the gander and all…

      • sportsfan18 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:59 PM

        mornelithe

        I just read a good bit of info further below. here is part of it.

        Gabe Feldman (@SportsLawGuy) is a professor at Tulane Law School, the director of the Tulane Sports Law Program, and the associate provost for NCAA Compliance.

        Even if MLB has evidence to justify a suspension, Rodriguez can make several arguments that a 211-game suspension is either too long or too arbitrary. First, assuming Selig claims that 150 of the games were for first (50 games) and second (100 games) offenses, Rodriguez can argue that the Joint Drug Agreement explicitly precludes MLB from punishing for a second offense before giving notice of a first. Specifically, Section 7 of the Joint Drug Agreement states that a player can’t be disciplined for a second or third violation of the policy that occurred before he received notice of his first violation. In this case, all of the conduct Rodriguez is being disciplined for presumably happened before he was given notice of his first violation. So Section 7’s notice requirement might limit Selig to a 50-game first-offense punishment.

        So, you want Bud to suspend Alex for conduct detrimental to the game if his suspension is shorter than he wants/likes even though he has no basis for a longer suspension.

        On top of that, you admit Bud is guilty of crap like Arod is too.

        So WHY should Alex be punished by Bud if his suspension is too short for Bud’s liking?

  5. flamethrower101 - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:49 PM

    All along I’ve maintained that I expect the suspension to be reduced when the decision finally comes back. Rodriguez has obviously deceived and lied about his continued use but under the new CBA and JDA a 1st offense is 50 games. Ryan Braun got an extra 15 because of his conduct following his appeal. Unless MLB has conclusive, airtight evidence that Rodriguez interfered with the investigation, intimidated witnesses, or outright lied, I don’t see how they could possibly justify a suspension longer than Braun’s.

  6. jss1330 - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:51 PM

    Alex should have to give a urine sample before every game. Bud should have to collect it.

  7. zinger99 - Jan 9, 2014 at 6:59 PM

    But A-Rod,why would you accept a reduced suspension? You haven’t done anything wrong! You piece of….

  8. 7mantel - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:00 PM

    TOTAL BS STORY ! The source said blah blah blah !

  9. bigdaddy44 - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:06 PM

    A-Rod, please spare everyone, both your fans and haters, by just going away. Permanently.

    • jwbiii - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:15 PM

      The Yankees don’t seem to be in any hurry to release him.

    • cackalackyank - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:27 PM

      Yes, we all know that you would walk away from 100 million bucks because you were embarrassed.

  10. unclemosesgreen - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:31 PM

    A-Rod is the worst! History’s greatest monster! He’s like the Aaron Hernandez of not killing people.

    / sharpens pitchfork and oils torch

    • Kevin S. - Jan 9, 2014 at 9:50 PM

      I’m not quite sure how I’m going to use it, but I’m definitely cribbing “He’s like the Aaron Hernandez of not killing people.” Well done.

      • Old Gator - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:01 PM

        Mose has been reading Cormac McCarthy. That’s how he can think in such terms so naturally.

      • unclemosesgreen - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:02 PM

        Thanks – I giggled when I typed it. You’re welcome to it.

  11. andyreidisfat - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:32 PM

    The people who keep saying he only owes 50 games because of the jda, stop reading Craig’s blogs. This man has been proven to have used steroids both before and after the new rules he has also lied every step of the way. He lied to MLB investigators at every turn. These can all be held as individual crimes. Much like the police can hit you with 50 counts of theft if you steal 50 items. Just cuz he got caught for everything at once doesn’t mean he didn’t commit multiple crimes.

    • clemente2 - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:45 PM

      Read the JDA. Please report on the penalties for hindering or obstructing.

      Waiting.

      Now, read the JDA. Report on the drug use penalties based on number of times used.

      Waiting.

      A-Rod has an argument he was never ‘caught’ (the real basis for penalties in the JDA). MLB has whatever evidence it does that they caught him. If the MLB is believed, then A-Rod has been caught once. Once. 50 games. He may take some more for ‘unseemly’ behavior like Braun, but that is just a negotiating decision to put it behind him.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:02 PM

      The people who keep saying he only owes 50 games because of the jda, stop reading Craig’s blogs.

      Ok, how’s this for credentials?

      Gabe Feldman (@SportsLawGuy) is a professor at Tulane Law School, the director of the Tulane Sports Law Program, and the associate provost for NCAA Compliance.

      Even if MLB has evidence to justify a suspension, Rodriguez can make several arguments that a 211-game suspension is either too long or too arbitrary. First, assuming Selig claims that 150 of the games were for first (50 games) and second (100 games) offenses, Rodriguez can argue that the Joint Drug Agreement explicitly precludes MLB from punishing for a second offense before giving notice of a first. Specifically, Section 7 of the Joint Drug Agreement states that a player can’t be disciplined for a second or third violation of the policy that occurred before he received notice of his first violation. In this case, all of the conduct Rodriguez is being disciplined for presumably happened before he was given notice of his first violation. So Section 7’s notice requirement might limit Selig to a 50-game first-offense punishment.

      http://www.grantland.com/blog/the-triangle/post/_/id/70997/defending-a-rod-breaking-down-the-rodriguez-appeal

      Much like the police can hit you with 50 counts of theft if you steal 50 items

      Wrong, see above

      • bh192012 - Jan 10, 2014 at 1:50 PM

        What I don’t understand, is if the only possible suspension for a first time offender is 50 games, then how could the union have allowed anyone to accept a 65 game suspension?

        I would assume that the union allowed Braun to accept it because of additional violations of the CBA. The same type of additional violations A-Rod may be facing. If the union thought those CBA violations were not prosecuteable, they would have gone to court. There’s no reason to let MLB set a precedent like that unless it was potentially valid. It would hurt other players besides Braun, so the union would have jumped in.

        In Braun’s case, I believe the union agreed that CBA violations were valid. I’m not aware of what specifically Braun violated in the CBA that the union would have agreed with, but apparently it was worth 15 days. I see no reason why A-Rod can’t be nailed for similar CBA violations worth various lengths of suspension.

  12. President Charles Logan - Jan 9, 2014 at 7:56 PM

    He’s done , face it, he’s a goner. His skills have diminished enough to a point where it’s not even worth the trouble . Anyone who actually defends this clown should have their head examined and not ever refer to themselves as true Baseball fans.

    • cackalackyank - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:31 PM

      He will put up a better line than at least 15 of the other 29 starting 3B in the majors. Count on it.

      • President Charles Logan - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:33 PM

        wont have the chance, so it wont matter …. and you’re dead wrong. get out of dreamland yankee fans

      • cackalackyank - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:15 PM

        Ahhh. The Truth comes out. SO, for you it is about the fact he is a Yankee, not that he broke MLB rules. The truth hurts to know that a diminished, disgraced A-rod will put up better numbers than all but a few regular 3B if he’s healthy. And the truth made you reveal the nature of your true bias in the matter.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:33 PM

      Alex Rodriguez 2013: .244/.348/.423 – 111 OPS+/113 wRC+ (note was batting .301/.388/.496 after 31 games but got hurt)

      all other 3b combined:

      .221/.290/.330 for a .69 wRC+

      Btw only 9 3b beat his wRC+ last year with at least 400 PA.

      (thank you RAB and IAATMS for the info)

    • clemente2 - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:38 PM

      So if he was playing like one of the ten best players in baseball history, like 10 years ago, it would be OK? But now that he is about an average MLB player (still valuable), his ‘behavior’ is not OK?

      You are the president of the clowns.

      • President Charles Logan - Jan 9, 2014 at 9:22 PM

        Its over move on …. the guy’s finished

    • unclemosesgreen - Jan 9, 2014 at 8:54 PM

      Wow, you’re giving Unclean Harold a real run for his money to claim the title of Most Demented HBT commenter. Nothing you say makes any sense whatsoever.

      Your user name is from a long cancelled show (way to keep up on your pop culture references) and the character was the biggest weasel on the show. He was characterized by weakness, moral turpitude, and a complete inability to make and stick to decisions. So at least you got that right.

      • President Charles Logan - Jan 9, 2014 at 9:22 PM

        Tune in to FOX this upcoming May … maybe I’m not dead yet you never know

      • Old Gator - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:06 PM

        Eh. Logan was small potatoes compared to Cliff Robertson in The Best Man.

      • unclemosesgreen - Jan 9, 2014 at 10:21 PM

        His unprincipled attacks on Henry Fonda will not soon be forgotten. And that brother of his! Don’t even get me started on that hatchet man.

  13. rathipon - Jan 10, 2014 at 1:28 AM

    He will either get 50 games or no games.

    MLB didn’t prove its obstruction case under the CBA. All they have on A-Rod is that he bought evidence. Well, so did MLB. It was absolutely reasonable for someone in A-Rod’s position to want to see what supposed evidence there was against him. And the only way to obtain those documents was to buy them. Now if MLB was able to subpoena A-Rod’s publicist and prove that he released info to the press to implicate other players and take the heat off him – Well that is nefarious and probably could justify a CBA suspension. But MLB got shut out by a Federal Court which quashed that subpoena. All MLB has is proof that A-Rod was preparing for a defense while they were building a case against him. Big deal.

    So that leaves the JDA charge. Pretty straightforward. 50 games on a first offense… If MLB can prove it. MLB’s evidence against A-Rod are documents written by one scumbag and stolen by two subsequent scumbags before being passed over to a MLB ‘security’ guy cloak and dagger style in exchange for a bag of money.

    What does MLB not have? A positive freaking test result!

    I think 0 games is the likely outcome. But I’m not going to discount the possibility that the evidence of drug use is better than I anticipate. So perhaps 50 games. We’ll see.

    • beachnbaseball - Jan 10, 2014 at 11:14 AM

      “I think 0 games is the likely outcome. But I’m not going to discount the possibility that the evidence of drug use is better than I anticipate. So perhaps 50 games. We’ll see.”

      Bold prediction. “I think 0 games but perhaps 50″. Wow! You’ve got it covered no matter what happens.

  14. disgracedfury - Jan 10, 2014 at 10:29 PM

    Any thing less than 100 is gonna be considered a major failure by the MLB.

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