Skip to content

Matt Moore to undergo season-ending Tommy John surgery

Apr 15, 2014, 12:02 AM EDT

Matt Moore Getty Getty Images

Rays left-hander Matt Moore was diagnosed with a partial tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his elbow last week. He attempted to throw today to see if the rehab route was a feasible option, but he confirmed to Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times after tonight’s game that he will undergo season-ending Tommy John surgery next Tuesday.

“What was coming out, it’s a shame to be have to be shut down right now but it just wasn’t comfortable,” Moore said. “Being stuck in the position I am right now, where it’s not exactly comfortable but it’s not exactly completely broke, it’s kind of one of those things where you know it’s going to get worse.”

Surgery is always the last option, but if the rehab route proved unsuccessful, it would only push the calendar back further for 2015. Getting the surgery out of the way now at least gives him a chance to contribute in a significant way next season. The typical rehab time after Tommy John surgery is somewhere around 12 months.

Moore has compiled a 3.53 ERA and 339/165 K/BB ratio over 347 innings in the majors. He turns 25 in June.

  1. mattyheisman - Apr 15, 2014 at 2:16 AM

    Good pitcher,sucks to see that happen. What is going on with the young pitchers? I don’t have any statistics to back this up but it seems like there’s way too many Tommy John surgeries. Kinda seems like the guys coming up aren’t built like they used to be. Or maybe it’s becoming too convenient to just have surgery and sit a year. Idk

    • raysfan1 - Apr 15, 2014 at 9:47 AM

      Dr Andrews has some interesting thoughts on this.
      http://hardballtalk.nbcsports.com/2014/04/10/dr-james-andrews-explains-why-tommy-john-surgery-is-on-the-rise/

  2. steelhammer92 - Apr 15, 2014 at 2:22 AM

    The majority of these young guys undergoing TJ surgery seem to be American. Again, this goes back to their overuse while playing youth baseball in America. The travel teams, premiere teams, etc in youth baseball all took off in the 90s. These players were the best players on their teams, and pitched until their arms fell off. All these 90s kids have grown up, are hitting the big leagues, and their arms are already worn out.

    • proudlycanadian - Apr 15, 2014 at 8:19 AM

      Atlanta is in the AL? Who knew?

    • braddavery - Apr 15, 2014 at 10:20 AM

      Do Japanese pitchers need a lot if TJS’s? Serious question. They pitch insane amounts of innings/pitches at young ages over there, so I’m curious as to how many TJS’s are needed on a yearly basis.

  3. moogro - Apr 15, 2014 at 2:24 AM

    phug

  4. dman6015 - Apr 15, 2014 at 7:01 AM

    Overuse in high school, college, minors.

  5. jb8588 - Apr 15, 2014 at 7:44 AM

    I agree that it could be overuse, but another thing could be the way the kids are taught these days and it’s a flaw in their mechanics. Somewhere along the way maybe the overall philosophy of how pitching is taught by coaches has changed in some way to the point where it has led to some sort of flaw in the mechanics in which these guys are pitching and is leading to all of these surgeries. It’s just truly amazing how guys back in day would throw tons of innings and even well over 300 innings a season at times (Walter Johnson, Sandy Koufax, Nolan Ryan some notable examples) and never had these issues that kids who pitch a lot less innings a season are having. Just really a crazy thing to see now…

    • Bryz - Apr 15, 2014 at 9:09 AM

      Those are the notable examples and typically the exceptions to the rule. There are countless others that blew their arms out that we’ll probably never know.

    • churchoftheperpetuallyoutraged - Apr 15, 2014 at 9:56 AM

      It’s just truly amazing how guys back in day would throw tons of innings and even well over 300 innings a season at times (Walter Johnson, Sandy Koufax, Nolan Ryan some notable examples) and never had these issues that kids who pitch a lot less innings a season are having.

      This is called survivorship bias. The reason you remember them is because they were able to pitch that long. You don’t remember all the pitchers who tried to do the same thing and flamed out because their arms couldn’t handle it. Guys like Fernando Valenzuela, Denny McClain, etc.

    • nbjays - Apr 15, 2014 at 10:13 AM

      Sandy Koufax never had issues with his arm? Wait, what?

  6. tfilarski - Apr 15, 2014 at 10:53 AM

    as a cubs fan, this could be a blessing in disguise, hopefully rays trade for jeff samardzija

    • braddavery - Apr 15, 2014 at 11:50 AM

      Really?

  7. randygnyc - Apr 15, 2014 at 11:17 AM

    Koufax had back trouble, not arm trouble.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Featured video

Three legends off to Cooperstown
Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. H. Street (3513)
  2. T. Tulowitzki (3261)
  3. C. Headley (2842)
  4. H. Ramirez (2727)
  5. Y. Puig (2721)
  1. R. Howard (2700)
  2. B. Belt (2592)
  3. C. Lee (2502)
  4. M. Trout (2332)
  5. J. Soria (2198)