Skip to content

Police report: Major League Baseball knowingly bought stolen documents

May 12, 2014, 7:29 AM EDT

MLB Commissioner Bud Selig speaks during a news conference in New York

The Boca Raton police say that Major League Baseball ignored repeated warnings that the records they sought in the Alex Rodriguez Biogenesis investigation had been stolen and that they were not to purchase them. They did it anyway. And that even though no MLB investigators were ultimately charged in the theft, there is “evidence of involvement” by MLB investigators in the theft of the documents. All of this is detailed in the police report obtained by Newsday and published last night.

We’ve known the broad strokes of all of this for some time: Former Biogenesis employee Porter Fischer had a fallout with Anthony Bosch. Fischer then obtained the documents which fueled the original Biogenesis news in the Miami New Times and upon which Major League Baseball relied to get evidence against Alex Rodriguez. However, Fischer stopped cooperating with MLB before they could get the documents from him. Then the documents were stolen from Fischer. Then Major League Baseball got the documents from someone else.

That someone else is a man named Gary Jones, who sold MLB the documents. Jones’ good friend is a man named Reginald St. Fleur, who was ultimately arrested for the break-in of Fischer’s car. You don’t have to be a genius to see what happened here: MLB knew the documents it was buying from Jones were the same ones stolen from Fischer. Sure, Major League Baseball has repeatedly denied that, but the Boca Raton police don’t buy that at all:

Major League Baseball ignored repeated warnings that records they sought in the Alex Rodriguez Biogenesis scandal had been stolen and that they were not to purchase them, according to Florida investigators and an April police report obtained by Newsday . . . Det. Terrence Payne wrote in his report that there was also “evidence of involvement” by “several MLB investigators” and three other men — two brothers from Long Island and a felon whom MLB paid $125,000 in exchange for the stolen records.

MLB continues as of Friday to deny any knowledge that the documents they purchased were stolen. This despite the fact that (a) they recently fired the investigators involved in all of this; and (b) despite being warned by police beforehand that the documents were stolen:

Sandra Boonenberg, a spokeswoman for the Boca Raton Police Department, stated unequivocally that a Florida investigator “warned MLB not to purchase the documents” and that the investigator told their detective about that conversation “before the documents were purchased” by MLB.

I have no doubt that sportswriters, fans and various major league players will come forward and claim that they don’t care about any of this and that it was worth getting Alex Rodriguez at any cost. The irony of this, of course, is that in doing so they are essentially endorsing criminal conduct by Major League Baseball employees as a means punishing A-Rod for crossing an ethical line.

Personally: I find a guy possibly getting away with taking some testosterone and HGH against company rules to be less of a problem than a felony. Maybe that’s just me being a crazy, cheater-loving apologist again. Maybe that’s just me being a contrarian and looking for any excuse to lay into sportswriters and other people who disagree with me on this stuff.

But maybe it’s also possible that MLB was the worse actor than A-Rod here and their pursuit of him was literally criminally overzealous. Maybe, rather than arguing, as so many have, that Bud Selig’s suspension of Alex Rodriguez was a vindication of MLB’s anti-drug policies, it should be acknowledged that it was pretty disgraceful.

Latest Posts
  1. The Mets have had an extremely Metsy 24 hours

    Jul 30, 2015, 4:07 PM EDT

    Screen Shot 2015-07-30 at 3.57.11 PM

    Defeat from the jaws of victory and then they got all wet.

  2. Daniel Nava designated for assignment by the Red Sox

    Jul 30, 2015, 3:50 PM EDT

    ALCS - Detroit Tigers v Boston Red Sox - Game One Getty Images

    Nava hit .303 in 134 games for the Red Sox in 2013, playing a key role in the team’s World Series title.

  3. Pirates DFA Vance Worley to make room for Joe Blanton

    Jul 30, 2015, 3:46 PM EDT

    Vance Worley AP

    It’s like we’re in Philly all over again.

  4. Breaking: The Blue Jays acquire David Price from the Tigers

    Jul 30, 2015, 12:39 PM EDT

    David Price AP

    The Blue Jays have their ace and now have their sights set on catching the Yankees.

  5. The reason for the collapse of the Brewers-Mets deal? Depends on who you ask.

    Jul 30, 2015, 11:15 AM EDT

    Carlos Gomez Carlos Gomez

    Money? Health? And what the hell is a “hip doctor” anyway?

  6. Miguel Montero wants the Cubs to activate him so he can play through a sprained thumb

    Jul 30, 2015, 10:47 AM EDT

    Miguel Montero Cubs Getty Images

    “If I wait to be 100 percent, it’s going to be season-ending.”

  7. MLB execs “absolutely convinced” that David Price is going to the Dodgers

    Jul 30, 2015, 9:56 AM EDT

    David Price David Price

    A playoff rotation of Kershaw, Greinke and Price would be reDONKulous.

  8. Cardinals, Fox Sports Midwest sign a billion dollar TV deal

    Jul 30, 2015, 9:37 AM EDT

    cardinals logo

    The Cardinals may be small market, but they’re certainly not small revenue.

  9. The Indians trade Brandon Moss to the Cardinals for pitching prospect Rob Kaminsky

    Jul 30, 2015, 9:15 AM EDT

    Brandon Moss Getty Images

    Moss is hitting just .217/.208/.487 this season but he has a line of .254/.340/.504 over the previous three years.

  10. What in the heck happened with the Carlos Gomez-Wilmer Flores trade that wasn’t?

    Jul 30, 2015, 8:45 AM EDT

    Screen Shot 2015-07-30 at 8.42.54 AM

    Even if the deal wasn’t done, the Mets should’ve taken Wilmer Flores out of the game.

  11. Both the Phillies and the Rangers did well in the Cole Hamels trade

    Jul 30, 2015, 7:33 AM EDT

    Ruben Amaro Getty Images

    Trades are judged twice: when they’re made and a couple of years later when we see how they turned out. For now, however, this is a win-win deal for Texas and Philadelphia.

Top 10 MLB Player Searches
  1. C. Hamels (5446)
  2. T. Tulowitzki (4115)
  3. J. Cueto (3873)
  4. A. Rodriguez (3815)
  5. M. Trout (3814)
  1. C. Gomez (3551)
  2. D. Price (3482)
  3. C. Gonzalez (3456)
  4. J. Reyes (3185)
  5. T. Clippard (3059)