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Biogenesis is not a drug scandal. THIS is a drug scandal.

May 20, 2014, 1:30 PM EDT

McMahon

Or at least an alleged one.

By way of disclaimer: I don’t offer this in my usual spirit of pumping up baseball at the expense of the NFL. This is way too serious a matter for that. And I hope like hell that the allegations here aren’t true. But if they are — if even part of them are — this would be a major, major story. One that could be far more serious for the NFL than the concussion thing:

A new class action has been filed against the NFL alleging that the league illegally used prescription pain-killers to mask injuries and to allow players to keep playing. The named plaintiffs include Bears Hall of Fame defensive end Richard Dent and former Bears quarterback Jim McMahon.

The allegations include claims that teams would conceal the diagnosis of injuries from players, pump them up with drugs and send them back on the field. Injuries like actual broken bones. McMahon claims that his teams doing them led him into a severe prescription drug addiction. Mike Florio has context about the legal hurdles the players have before them and talks about the complexities of it all here. Given Mike’s legal background, if this story is of interest to you, be sure to follow at PFT.

In any event, if these allegations are borne out, it makes Biogenesis, BALCO and any other drug scandal we’ve seen in sports look like child’s play. I mean, it’s one thing when some rogue athletes willingly take some things they shouldn’t in an effort to get healthy again following an injury. It’s another thing altogether for the league itself to be involved in a pattern of behavior in which players are given drugs for the specific purpose of getting injured bodies back on the field before they have a chance to get healthy. Against their will and without their knowledge if the allegations here are true.

Here’s hoping that, unlike with any of the other drug scandals in sports, this one is treated with the amount of gravity it is actually owed.

  1. goskinsvt - May 20, 2014 at 1:32 PM

    Well, they are both drug scandals. But yes, one seems much more egregious than the other.

  2. jarathen - May 20, 2014 at 1:37 PM

    What’s sad is that the American public doesn’t care. When an arrogant player beats our old humble heroes of yesteryear, it’s scandal. But when a league consistently abuses its players and hides until its caught, and then shrugs and stuffs money into settlements, no one cares.

    • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 2:04 PM

      Hey genius…the owners of these teams were not the owners back then and didn’t make any money off of these yesteryear players. They were paid a game that has huge risks. Some benefited, some didn’t.

      • ashot - May 20, 2014 at 2:13 PM

        “the owners of these teams were not the owners back then and didn’t make any money off of these yesteryear players”

        Hey genius, that’s a non-sequitur. What does the fact that there are new owners have to do with whether or not the players should sue the league?

        “They were paid a game that has huge risks.”

        Yes, but I suspect those risks did not include doctor’s lying to them about the severity of their injuries and given them medication to cover up the severity of the injuries.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 2:57 PM

        Hey genius…the owners of these teams were not the owners back then

        This is hilarious considering the Rooneys, Maras, Ralph Wilson and Al Davis were all original owners, or original owner’s families. That’s 12.5% of the owners, then throw in Jones that’s been an owner for 25 years, Kraft has been an owner for 20 years…

      • Balladeer - May 20, 2014 at 2:57 PM

        Sweet babe, lost in the woods. Here’s hoping you find your way back…

        Here’s some breadcrumbs to get you started: profootballtalk.nbcsports.com

      • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 3:08 PM

        They can sue whomever they like, this is not a publicly traded corporation, it’s a league made up of individual owners. Most of whom were not the employers of these players back then. Therefore, they should not have to pay any of these cry baby players a dime.

      • asimonetti88 - May 20, 2014 at 3:09 PM

        Ralph Wilson died a couple months ago I thought?

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 4:00 PM

        Yes, but Dent and McMahon played in the 80s and 90s. So the claim that the current owners (I believe the Bills are looking for new owners now) shouldn’t be held liable for what was done in the past is a joke.

    • Balladeer - May 20, 2014 at 2:55 PM

      Exactly. Perfectly articulated. People like to say “how am I supposed to tell my kid that so and so cheated?” but for some reason, they rarely have the same reservations about these kinds of scandals. Perhaps because they don’t even want to bring it up at all. I think people get so bent out of shape about steroids because they believe that without steroids these athletes are just regular guys like everyone else, which even the most insane, rabid anti-steroid evangelists would concede is just not true

  3. Innocent Bystander - May 20, 2014 at 1:38 PM

    Even if true, it still won’t be as big of deal as it would in baseball because in football it’s OK. Plus football has more important things to overanalyze… like Tim Tebow. drrrr.

    • renaado - May 20, 2014 at 2:31 PM

      As a Makati city native, it’s really sad to see his NFL career was short lived. His Tim Tebow health foundation here truly shows how magnificent of a player and human being he truly is.

      • asimonetti88 - May 20, 2014 at 3:10 PM

        Just because he’s a good guy doesn’t mean he’s a good football player. He does a lot of great charity work, but that doesn’t make him any more accurate throwing a football.

      • renaado - May 20, 2014 at 3:19 PM

        True that, should’ve meant a great human being only. Really don’t watch some this so called NFL games anyways.

  4. nolanwiffle - May 20, 2014 at 1:46 PM

    If it’s all the same to you, I’ll read about this somewhere other than Florio’s site. He’s a bit of a buffoon.

    • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 3:00 PM

      I vowed to never again read PFT. My soul feels better for it.

  5. jimmyt - May 20, 2014 at 1:47 PM

    Maybe you’re on to something. After all murder is worse than rape.

  6. racksie - May 20, 2014 at 1:48 PM

    I guess this is not that surprising to me. Which is pretty sad. Although the fact that teams were hiding injuries from the players seems a bit odd. But I guess when the team says you are good to go, the NFL mentality is that you go. With a little help from your friend…

    • asimonetti88 - May 20, 2014 at 3:14 PM

      If they were actually hiding injuries from them, or not advising them of the health risks associated with using the painkillers, this will be an easy case for the players to win.

      All the books by NFL players I’ve read, however, say that the doctors did advise them of the risks, and that many even signed waivers when they took the painkillers. If that’s true, I’d think it would be hard for the players to win, but I’m not a lawyer so who knows, I could be wrong, it happened once.

      It is somewhat amusing to me that this is news to anyone though. Football is a tough and physical game, I played for over 10 years, obviously not in the pros or major college divisions, but even then, you have people using painkillers. Obviously in high school and stuff it’s the tame stuff like Advil, Aspirin etc but this whole thing shouldn’t be news to anyone, at least IMO.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 4:04 PM

        All the books by NFL players I’ve read, however, say that the doctors did advise them of the risks, and that many even signed waivers when they took the painkillers. If that’s true, I’d think it would be hard for the players to win, but I’m not a lawyer so who knows, I could be wrong, it happened once.

        Depends on how they were “advised”:

        A: Take this pill, it’ll help ease the pain and get you back on the field

        B: Take this narcotic pill that’ll help hide ease the pain, and let you get back on the field because you won’t feel your body telling you not to play, which is what pain is. Oh by the way, because this is a narcotic it’s extremely easy to develop an addiction to it, and might cause problems for you in the future.

  7. voteforno6 - May 20, 2014 at 1:55 PM

    Wasn’t there a problem a few years ago with a baseball team (Boston, I think) routinely giving Toradol to its players? It seems to be different only by a matter of degree.

    • sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - May 20, 2014 at 2:35 PM

      I think it is the “without their knowledge or consent” part here that is the difference. If the Sox med staff was telling guys who had broken ribs that they were fine, and sent them back out to play, then questioned their toughness in the media when the player continued to complain, until a different doctor found that the player had broken ribs, then there could be a scandal here.

      But that could never happen in baseball, Amirite?

    • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 2:59 PM

      Wasn’t there a problem a few years ago with a baseball team (Boston, I think) routinely giving Toradol to its players?

      It’s big in the NFL too (not sure about it’s baseball use). Which makes the commissioner’s office response to Robert Mathis’s failed drug test even funnier (for reference, Mathis was busted for using Clomid, which is a male, and female, fertility drug and is also a known PED. The office responded saying the FDA hasn’t approved its use in men. The joke is, Toradol isn’t FDA approved either).

      • balsagna - May 20, 2014 at 3:42 PM

        Clomid is commonly used as a post cycle therapy (PCT) after a cycle of steroids. It restores your testosterone levels to normal after a cycle of steroids, which are essentially zero after a cycle of steroids. Please try to educate yourself before you spew your ignorance. He had to be suspended. Regardless of his excuse, he used a substance that is commonly used with PEDs to restore normal testosterone production. The NFL can not dole out punishment on a case by case basis attempting to determine the validity of the accused’s story. If that was the case, every single person who was caught using banned substances would easily come up with a plausible excuse for why they had it in their system. The fact is the players are responsible FOR ANY SUBSTANCE in their body. If it is there, you will get suspended, regardless of your reasons why. This is the only way the system can survive and I applaud the NFL for suspending him.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 4:05 PM

        Please try to educate yourself before you spew your ignorance.

        reread what I wrote again before calling someone ignorant. I’m going to repost the relevant comment, and highlight the important part:

        Mathis was busted for using Clomid, which is a male, and female, fertility drug and is also a known PED

  8. mt10425 - May 20, 2014 at 1:57 PM

    Most of the financially struggling country would readily tolerate what former athletes whine about to support their families. The fact that overpaid athletes squandered their money being celebrities and NOW want to sue it’s what’s sad.

    • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 2:06 PM

      Totally agree, they want to be paid for by current owners who didn’t even know that this was going on. That’s like buying a pizza shop from someone else and having to pay someone who choked on some pizza when the place had a different owner.

      • sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - May 20, 2014 at 2:38 PM

        The current owners are benefiting from the work of the previous owners. And the NFL is still the NFL, regardless of changes in membership.

      • stex52 - May 20, 2014 at 2:50 PM

        Current owners didn’t know? Ever heard of due diligence?

    • stex52 - May 20, 2014 at 2:06 PM

      So the fact they are overpaid gives the team the right to lie to them about serious injuries, pump them up with drugs and send them out on the field in search of more severe injuries..

      Yeah, that sounds okay to me.

    • doctorofsmuganomics - May 20, 2014 at 2:55 PM

      You’re an idiot.

      That’s all.

    • Wesley Clark - May 20, 2014 at 3:42 PM

      This should be exhibit A for being an NFL Apologist. Good lord.

  9. El Bravo - May 20, 2014 at 2:00 PM

    What is this? Does the NFL think it is the USMC?

  10. paulier55 - May 20, 2014 at 2:01 PM

    I’m sure many of the NFL’s myriad apologists will simply try to dismiss this by saying something like, “Well, they knew the risks when they signed up”, or something equally idiotic.

    • chill1184 - May 20, 2014 at 2:12 PM

      Sadly your right, a lot them will think that. This is going to be real interesting to follow in the coming months

    • mckludge - May 20, 2014 at 4:30 PM

      “They bought their tickets. They knew what they were getting into. I say, let ‘em crash.”

  11. ralphdibny - May 20, 2014 at 2:13 PM

    I remember watching an NFL playoff game many years ago (don’t remember which one) when Steve McNair was the oft-injured Titans QB. McNair had been questionable for the game, but started and played well. In the 4th quarter, he began underthrowing his passes and looking otherwise beat up. Steve Young, who was calling the game, started talking not about how playing the first three quarters had taken their toll, but about how the horse tranquilizers the medical staff had given McNair were starting to wear off. Young spoke from experience, talking about how he had experienced the same 4th quarter come-down in his career. What I’m saying is that it’s been common knowledge for a long time that the league drugs up its players to get them on the field.

    • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 3:11 PM

      correct, but those long time takers of drugs are now broke after years of not saving a dime, and are looking to finger point and play stupid (although most of them aren’t playing sadly), and look at the golden goose to subsidize the rest of their lives.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 3:35 PM

        Yeah it’s definitely that they didn’t save any money. I’m sure almost all of them knew about the crippling medical costs they were going to face for the next 50+ years of their lives.

  12. sdelmonte - May 20, 2014 at 2:14 PM

    I would say “extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof.” This isn’t to say I don’t believe it happened. The way the NFL still treats its players, it seems far too likely. But whether the plaintiffs can win in court, I can’t say.

    Still, it just follows a pattern of behavior by arrogant owners who take advantage of a macho culture that looks ever more toxic. Whatever is wrong with how the lords of baseball run their game now, it seems small next to the systematic abuse of the NFL (which isn’t to say that I give those who purchased the stolen Biogenesis papers a free pass). One of these days, I am going to not turn on the TV on a Sunday, going to stop following football.

  13. thetoolsofignorance - May 20, 2014 at 2:16 PM

    The crowd who like to point out how much athletes make will surely chime in about how “he got paid, he knew the risks, boo-hoo”. Well none of these kids signed up to be crippled and the owners got filthy rich and didn’t get crippled, so how is that even an argument?

    If this has any merit at all I hope the NFL loses its shirt to the ex-players.

    • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 3:19 PM

      They did get paid, and you can’t compare to intelligent owners who invested wisely and got rich. You have people who can’t read above a 3rd grade level, so of course, almost all of them are broke now.

      • thetoolsofignorance - May 20, 2014 at 5:11 PM

        So taking advantage of them because they can’t read is ok? I don’t know what in sam hill point you’re trying to make here

      • Wesley Clark - May 20, 2014 at 7:14 PM

        So all the owners invested wisely and got rich while the players are dummies who can’t pass a 3rd grade reading test. Got it. If only life was so black and white. You do realize that there is a ton of family money that owns the NFL right? Do you think Al Davis’ son dug ditches to buy the Raiders?

  14. zdravit - May 20, 2014 at 2:20 PM

    Florio is the devil. Never post links to his filth.

  15. jrob23 - May 20, 2014 at 2:26 PM

    McMahon is on record stating he willingly took the drugs so he could get back on the field. It’s funny how all these players who 100% were willingly on steroids would bitch and moan years later that their poor decisions led to drug addiction. Were they pressured to do so? Well, they wanted to win, get back on the field, and fend off their backups so yeah. But teams didn’t hide injuries. With swelling and the less than ideal testing environment for these injuries in the training rooms I can see some misdiagnosis and players given a shot to help with pain. Then the players’ competitive juices took over and back on the field they went. This story is no worse than the concussion scandal where players were sent back out. The team needed the players on the field, most times the player fought for it, end of story. This new lawsuit is another cash grab by players to get money since they are all broke now.

    The players got filthy rich for playing a game as well, not just the owners. Especially compared to the fans. So spare me the sanctimonious arguments

    • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 3:07 PM

      You didnt read the post, did you?

      • jrob23 - May 20, 2014 at 5:05 PM

        yeah, I pretty much touched on every relevant part of the post douche. read much?

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - May 20, 2014 at 6:11 PM

        Did you really? Let’s break it down FJM style:

        McMahon is on record stating he willingly took the drugs so he could get back on the field.

        If I have a backache, and you offer my ibuprofen for it, but in reality you are giving me oxycodone, do I not have a right to complain?

        It’s funny how all these players who 100% were willingly on steroids would bitch and moan years later that their poor decisions led to drug addiction

        Irrelevant. They aren’t blaming steroids on their current issues, they are blaming medications/drugs that they didn’t know they were taking.

        Were they pressured to do so? Well, they wanted to win, get back on the field, and fend off their backups so yeah.

        So they were pressured to take a medication/drug they didn’t consent to? Glad we agree.

        This new lawsuit is another cash grab by players to get money since they are all broke now.

        What’s the other cash grab? The one where the NFL lied about concussion issues and helped indirectly cause multiple player’s deaths? You think that’s a cash grab?

  16. braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 2:27 PM

    “I mean, it’s one thing when some rogue athletes willingly take some things they shouldn’t in an effort to get healthy again following an injury.”

    Why are you always downplaying PED use in baseball? I didn’t realize that Bonds, Sosa, McGwire, Clemens, etc… were perpetually “injured” for 5-8 straight years and were only using PEDs “in an effort to get healthy again following an injury”. I was under the impression they were using to help them play better baseball and make more millions. You learn something new everyday.

    • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 2:30 PM

      And now it is/was “rogue athletes” and not the epidemic that you and so many others usually say it is/was. You know, the “They are ALL taking something” routine. You must have forgotten.

      • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 3:17 PM

        No, no, no, Brad. You are not allowed to say that performance enhancing drugs had performance enhancing benefits, here at Hardball Talk. The PEDS-had-no-effect-greenies-were-worse police will be along shortly to correct you.

      • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 3:21 PM

        Yes, I await the usual 4 to 5 PED apologists to make their copy-and-paste statements regarding the issue. lol

    • nobody78 - May 20, 2014 at 2:53 PM

      braddavery is right. Craig, it’s comments like that that make you seem like a steroid apologist.

      This is far, far, far, far, far, FAR worse than a baseball player doping voluntarily for any reason, including greed. There’s no question about it, and no need to whitewash regular doping to make it clear that this is something of a different order.

      • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 2:59 PM

        I’m in no way downplaying this new NFL situation, it’s a situation that has been rampant in football for a long, long time and needs to be looked at in detail. As you stated, it’s the downplaying of PED use in baseball to prop up this new story that I find insulting to our intelligence.

    • Craig Calcaterra - May 20, 2014 at 4:36 PM

      “rouge” meaning “done on one’s own, not with official imprimatur or concerted effort.” Even if tons of baseball players took PEDs — even if we call it an epidemic — it is a rogue act, as opposed to the NFL story in which the league and teams themselves are alleged to have mandated or even coerced drug use.

      As for “recovering from injuries,” basically every baseball player who has ever been busted has cited that as the reason for using. Some are lying, obviously, but there is a clear benefit from PEDs ballplayers have used in terms of injury and workout recovery. Meaning: getting one’s body healthy ready to play. Contrast this with drugs in the NFL report which are designed to mask injury and let players do worse damage to their bodies in the interest of getting on the field.

      • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 4:41 PM

        Actually, rouge is “a red powder or cream that is used to make your cheeks pinker”. ; )

      • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 4:49 PM

        But but but, I thought Bud Selig and MLB were implicit in the use and cover-up of the use of PEDs??? Now they had nothing to do with it?

      • Craig Calcaterra - May 20, 2014 at 5:01 PM

        PLAYER ARE USING ROUGE! AND EYELINER!

      • crackersnap - May 20, 2014 at 7:25 PM

        “…not with official imprimatur or concerted effort…”

        Well, there is that whole “MLB teams used to lay out a bowl of greenies for their players before games back in the 60’s” thing…

  17. sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - May 20, 2014 at 2:39 PM

    So, ’70s and ’80s NFL was basically Rollerball? Art imitates life, or the other way around?

    • renaado - May 20, 2014 at 2:42 PM

      I think it was Handegg since the beginning.

  18. grumpyoleman - May 20, 2014 at 2:48 PM

    NFL players knew what they were doing. They could have said no. I’m sure many baseball players have done the same thing over the years. I would doubt Miggy was taking two advil before his games last year and calling it good.

    • stex52 - May 20, 2014 at 2:51 PM

      That’s the point of the suit. They didn’t know. They were being lied to.

  19. sabatimus - May 20, 2014 at 2:50 PM

    “I don’t offer this in my usual spirit of pumping up baseball at the expense of the NFL.”

    With your title, and then saying it’s an “alleged one”, forgive me if I don’t buy your disclaimer.

  20. mkd - May 20, 2014 at 2:55 PM

    Being willing to learn new things is a mark of good character. You’re an inspiration.

  21. braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 3:07 PM

    This, to me, is a “football culture” situation similar to the recent Dolphins harassment scandal. It has been WIDELY accepted that football players “should do whatever it takes” to stay on the field since football was invented. But now some players want reparations for what was, in the past, widely accepted behavior by players and teams alike. It’s a thought-provoking situation, to say the least.

    • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 3:15 PM

      I agree with your comment, however, the players have a choice of not being drugged up and playing. If they get replaced by someone else and are cut and not paid, then so be it. They made the choice to get back out there so that some young upstart can’t take over for them.

      • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 3:19 PM

        “If they get replaced by someone else and are cut and not paid, then so be it.”

        Herein lies their argument and why they very well can win this. In essence, they weren’t FORCED to do anything due to their own free will, but if they didn’t do it, their livelihoods could be directly affected by their choice.

    • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 3:25 PM

      I think I’m missing the point of your post. I fully acknowledge the NFL mindset of “you must play at all costs”. But the thing with this lawsuit is that these players are alleging being drugged without their knowledge.

      It’s not hard to imagine a scenario where a team gives a player an IV for dehydration, yet the IV is laced with some addictive pain killer. I have no idea how you prove that kind of thing, even if it did actually happen, short of having the people who did the doping admit to it.

      If this is true, it’s far worse than someone who knowingly took pain meds. Imagine any doctor slipping some unknown medication into your IV, or even your morning coffee. There’s countless other ways this type of intentional, unknowing doping could have been accomplished. If true, it’s pretty despicable.

      • braddavery - May 20, 2014 at 3:33 PM

        I agree that there is a ton of gray area on this issue. It will be tough for them to prove that they were being lied to and deceived into taking things that could affect their future health. On one hand they should have known what was going into their bodies and what the future affects could be, on the other I don’t know that that info was even available to them at the time.

      • grumpyoleman - May 20, 2014 at 4:11 PM

        You would still know if they were slipping painkillers into an IV. If they were trying to mask some type of major injury it would take a pretty good quantity of happy juice to do that. Also, you would either have an extra bag of pain meds hanging from the pole or someone would have to shoot it into the drip.

  22. stlouis1baseball - May 20, 2014 at 3:18 PM

    Come on people. If you tell me you didn’t know this happened or if you tell me you are surprised at the allegations, I am going to respond by telling you I don’t believe you. This crap happened to me (and others) in high school! Did our entire collection of HBT brethren just fall off the sonofabitchin’ turnip truck?

    Disclaimer: I am NOT saying it’s right. Beacuse it is certainly wrong. I am just saying it has been going on since the sport was invented. Therefore, this is in no way, shape or form…news.

    • tmarlin122 - May 20, 2014 at 3:22 PM

      BREAKING NEWS…WWF wrestlers now say being slammed on their heads nightly is causing them to have brain injuries ! They also say that Vince Mcmahon wanted them to do it, so they did it not realizing that being slammed on their heads would have long term health risks.

    • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 3:33 PM

      @stlouis: you were unknowingly slipped pain killers in high school? The trainers kept you drugged on pain killers until you were addicted, and it was completely unknown to you?

      Because that’s what this lawsuit is saying. I think there’s a bit of difference between someone who knowingly took pain meds, and someone who was slipped pain meds unknowingly in, for instance, an IV.

      • stlouis1baseball - May 20, 2014 at 3:40 PM

        I can only speak for myself…but I can tell you injuries were (and are) routinely masked by trainers, coaches and the like. This has always happened. It will continue to happen.

      • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 4:15 PM

        What does that mean — they were masked? I’m not doubting you, I’m sincerely asking. I wasn’t often hurt, so I can’t comment on what my trainers were doing. I get that they probably told the coaches, “Oh, he’s okay, let him play” when players asked them to. I saw that all the time.

        But I would be STUNNED to find out that my high school training staff was effectively drugging me and my fellow players with pain medications, without our knowledge. I’ve never heard anyone allege that. Ever. But you’re saying that this exact thing happens all the time. That certainly has not been my experience, but who knows, maybe I’m in a minority.

        If high school kids in every sport across the country are being routinely drugged, without their knowledge, this would rate as one of the biggest scandals in modern history.

        To say, “Oh this happens all the time” belittles, I think, what the players are actually alleging in this suit.

      • stlouis1baseball - May 20, 2014 at 5:47 PM

        By “masked” I mean hidden. But I played in a different time (graduated in 90′).
        When a lot of the more skilled players played both ways (Center and Linebacker for me).
        I also started playing varsity as a Sophomore (which means I got a great deal more reps than a lot of players). So it stands to reason I was banged up a little more. For what it’s worth, I look at cortisone shots very similar to typical pain medicine that is given today. It might not be good for you…but it serves it’s immediate purpose.

  23. ningenito78 - May 20, 2014 at 3:20 PM

    What the hell are you talking about Craig? The coaches held down the players and pumped then full of drugs then kicked them onto the field? This is just another angle for the ex-players to get extended health coverage. Nothing to see here. Now stop trying to slap the big boy in the room. The NFL will always overshadow your little game.

    • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 3:27 PM

      Why are you yelling at Craig? It’s not his lawsuit.

      You can’t imagine a way that someone could slip pain meds, unknown, to an athlete, other than your example of holding them down?

    • Wesley Clark - May 20, 2014 at 3:32 PM

      No one is worried about ‘the big boy in the room.” The problem with the NFL is, to be quite blunt, the ignorant fans and the team owners. The teams chew these players up and spit them out when they won’t “restructure” their contracts. The fans talk about the players being greedy while the owners are raking in record profits. If this lawsuit can be proven in court, the NFL is in some real trouble. Sadly, this isn’t even the tip of the iceberg as far as drugs in the NFL are concerned. The testing for PEDs is a joke. When will they even begin testing for HGH?

      • sophiethegreatdane - May 20, 2014 at 3:34 PM

        Agreed.

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