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Jeff Samardzija finally has a win

May 26, 2014, 7:20 PM EDT

Jeff Samardzija Getty Getty Images

The (long) wait is over. Cubs right-hander Jeff Samardzija pitched in a ton of tough luck over his first 10 starts this season, but he finally got into the win column today as part of an 8-4 victory over the Giants in at AT&T Park in San Francisco.

Samardzija allowed four runs (three earned) on six hits and no walks over seven-plus innings in the win. He struck out 10 batters for the first time this season. It was the sixth double-digit strikeout game of his career.

The Cubs averaged 1.82 runs per game in Samardzija’s first 10 starts this season, the lowest in the majors, but they put eight runs on the board today against Yusmeiro Petit and David Huff. The win was actually his first since August 24 of last year, a span of 17 starts.

Samardzija now owns a fantastic 1.68 ERA and 64/21 K/BB in 75 innings over his first 11 starts this season. Only the Cardinals’ Adam Wainwright (1.67 ERA) has a lower ERA among starters. The Cubs have quite a trade commodity on their hands here.

  1. cohnjusack - May 26, 2014 at 7:23 PM

    Gives up 0 runs three times, gets 0 wins

    Gives up (tied) for the most runs he’s given up all yea, earns a win.

    Good lord, can we please kill the pitcher win stat?

  2. tfbuckfutter - May 26, 2014 at 7:47 PM

    I really am beginning to think that no one likes that guy.

    Anyone who truly liked him would say “Shave your face and/or get a haircut. You look like a child molester.”

    Who is hanging out with him at the bar? Kid Rock?

    • kardshark1 - May 26, 2014 at 8:47 PM

      Oh, I get it… He doesn’t look like you or the people you hang out with, therefore he’s unlikeable.

      Believe it or not, some people judge others on their personality, beliefs and their actions, not their looks.

      • tfbuckfutter - May 26, 2014 at 8:53 PM

        There’s a difference between judging someone on their looks and judging what the choices one makes with the areas they control say about their personality.

        And his facial hair broadcasts that one ought not leave their children alone with him.

        Which is unfortunate, because I am quite sure that’s not the case with him. So I assume no one has told him that the way he chooses to groom himself projects that image.

        http://fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/off-camber-off-topic/684363d1359601749-ever-wanted-put-face-avatar-5ad1e647.gif

        If he went to the effort of wearing these glasses I would say the same thing about them as I’m saying about his facial hair.

      • jeffbbf - May 28, 2014 at 12:11 AM

        OMG, you are such a friggin’ tool. Get a sense of humor and leave your holier than thou crap at the knitting bee.

  3. Charles Gates - May 26, 2014 at 7:56 PM

    Disagree. Keep the win stat. It’s the most obvious fool barometer for people that cite it above all else.

  4. kiwicricket - May 26, 2014 at 8:02 PM

    I was kind of hoping he would remain win-less the entire season and win the ERA crown. Heads would explode, Rick Sutcliff would be so confused he would eat himself.

  5. keltictim - May 26, 2014 at 8:07 PM

    The win/loss count for a pitcher makes sense only in the sense that in a team sport, the pitcher is the most individual player responsible for a win or loss. If they pitch a great game, it’s generally a win. When they pitch a bad game, it’s generally a loss. Obviously it’s not a definite, but it’s the closest thing there is to one person being responsible for the outcome. If you don’t like it, don’t pay attention to it. Do teams pay attention to it? I’m sure they give it some credence, not as much as others, but some.

    • kardshark1 - May 26, 2014 at 8:42 PM

      “The win/loss count for a pitcher makes sense only in the sense that in a team sport, the pitcher is the most individual player responsible for a win or loss. If they pitch a great game, it’s generally a win. When they pitch a bad game, it’s generally a loss.”

      Wow. You do realize a pitcher could pitch identical “great” games back to back, same pitch for pitch, same exact stuff and movement… Yet one of those games he gets shelled for 10 runs in 5 innings and the other is a no hitter. And also, he might get the win in the game he gets shelled, yet the loss in the no hitter. So does Wins still sound like a purposeful stat?

      Tim Lincecum 3 days ago pitched one of he worst games of the year for a Giants’ starter, yet he got the win.

      So knowing this, what is the upside of the Win stat? What does it accomplish? There’s absolutely zero truth behind it. When the only reason to keep something is because, “that’s the way it’s always been,” is the only answer, that’s probably not a good reason.

      • infieldhit - May 26, 2014 at 9:20 PM

        A good example is Chris Sale, who had pretty similar numbers the last two seasons, except for his record. And if you put that much stock in pitcher wins, you’d assume he was that much better in ’12 than he was in ’13.

        We’re two months in the season, and would anyone in their right mind say that

      • infieldhit - May 26, 2014 at 9:22 PM

        …Samardzija is having a bad year because he only has one win, and so he must be doing something wrong?

    • cohnjusack - May 26, 2014 at 9:02 PM

      The win/loss count for a pitcher makes sense only in the sense that in a team sport, the pitcher is the most individual player responsible for a win or loss

      This is the most astounding inaccurate statement about baseball that I’ve ever heard, and I’ve watched dozens of games announced by Hawk Harrelson.

      • kardshark1 - May 26, 2014 at 9:51 PM

        “I’ve watched dozens of games announced by Hawk Harrelson.”

        If you didn’t have the mute button on, this is the most astounding statement about baseball that I’VE ever heard.

      • moogro - May 27, 2014 at 2:54 AM

        Hawk is painful. But the Adam Dunn home run to beat the Yanks was pretty funny.

        PIOTB, yyeaaaaaa…yes!…yes!………………HELL yes!!

  6. musketmaniac - May 26, 2014 at 8:39 PM

    How much does he fight. When the Yankees make him cut his hair in August.

  7. sportsfan18 - May 26, 2014 at 8:47 PM

    on base percentage is much more important than batting average.

    Brandon Phillips has been around .280 batting this year with an on base percentage barely above .300

    Right now, Brandon’s batting average is .281 and his on base percentage is only .307

    .307 is NOT very good at all. the NL league average flucutates a bit year to year but it is usually around .331 give or take.

    Joey Votto is struggling a bit so far this year from the plate. His batting average is only .257 right now… BUT his on base percentage is .410 which places him 5th in the N.L. so far this season.

    Anyone who knows baseball would much have a player getting on base 41% of the time to less than 31% of the time even though the batter with the 31% on base percentage has a much higher batting average.

    On base percentage should replace batting average as I want to see how often a player actually reaches base when he comes up to bat, which encompasses MORE than simply batting average. You gotta get on base.

    • cohnjusack - May 26, 2014 at 9:04 PM

      I think it should be rebranded and inverted. Call it “out percentage” and see if people understand it then.

      “Brandon Phillips has 69.3% out percentage while Joey Votto’s is only 59%”

  8. keltictim - May 27, 2014 at 6:19 AM

    I was only making the point that the pitcher is the closest thing to one person who can control wins and losses in a game. Is it perfect? Absolutely not. Is their another player that so closely influences the win or loss of a game? No, there isn’t. I also thought I made it pretty clear that teams don’t put much stock in it at all, well until a pitcher wins 20 or some high number, then it’s good PR all around.

  9. keltictim - May 27, 2014 at 6:20 AM

    You can disagree with me without being a lil Richard. Well maybe you can’t, but you could try.

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