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The Red Sox are four-deep on the manager depth chart against the Rays

May 30, 2014, 9:37 PM EDT

John Farrell, Dan BEllion John Farrell, Dan BEllion

On Sunday, the benches cleared in a game between the Red Sox and Rays in Florida. The Red Sox weren’t happy that Yunel Escobar stole third base with a five-run lead in the bottom of the seventh inning. The bad blood continued on Friday night’s game between the two teams, this time in Boston.

In the first inning, Rays starter David Price hit Red Sox DH David Ortiz, prompting home plate umpire Dan Bellino to issue warnings to both benches. This didn’t sit well with Red Sox manager John Farrell, so he came out to argue with Bellino. It’s understandable — the Rays got their┬áchance to throw at someone, while the Red Sox would not be afforded such an opportunity. Farrell was ejected.

Bench coach Torey Lovullo took over for Farrell. Price hit Mike Carp with a pitch in the bottom of the fourth inning, prompting both dugouts to empty. Bellino concluded that Price did not intentionally hit Carp, so he did not eject Price.┬áLovullo spoke his mind to Bellino before being ejected. Third base coach Brian Butterfield took Lovullo’s spot in the dugout as manager of the Red Sox.

In the top of the sixth, Sox starter Brandon Workman threw behind Rays third baseman Evan Longoria. Bellino ejected Workman for intentionally throwing at a batter, and Butterfield was automatically ejected as well. Hitting coach Greg Colbrunn became the latest acting manager, and Burke Badenhop replaced Workman on the mound.

For those keeping score at home, here are the managers the Red Sox have gone through tonight:

  • John Farrell
  • Torey Luvullo
  • Brian Butterfield
  • Greg Colbrunn

If Colbrunn is ejected, the Red Sox may have to bring back Bobby Valentine. (I shamelessly stole this joke from D.J. Short on Twitter.)

Also of note: the Rays have hit two Red Sox with pitches, and no one has been ejected. The Red Sox have hit no one (but intentionally threw at Longoria, of course) and have had four members ejected. To be fair, however, they did start the whole shebang by getting upset over a very questionable reading of baseball’s unwritten rules.

  1. stevephoenix - May 31, 2014 at 3:41 AM

    Wouldn’t it be interesting if Boston ever got a real team and got rid of the Bad News Bears version of bush league slapheads they call a team? Pass da roidies from da left hand side Big Papi…

    • theskinsman - May 31, 2014 at 5:21 AM

      Congrats,stevie, you win the dumbest post of the week award! A real team, like the defending world champions? You’d need another half a brain to step up to imbecile.

  2. miguelcairo - May 31, 2014 at 8:41 AM

    Bunch of bearded, classless bums.

  3. rjostewart - May 31, 2014 at 9:24 AM

    The “bad blood” between Price and Ortiz didn’t start with the incident last week.
    http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/big-league-stew/david-price-not-happy-david-ortiz-standing-watching-051304793–mlb.html

  4. thepancakebandit - May 31, 2014 at 12:00 PM

    I’m a lifelong Sox fan. That aside, I’m really sick of hearing of these incidents where someone steals a base or something with a big lead. I can’t fault the Rays for doing it, or any team. Consider it protecting your lead.

    It baffles me how tempers flare up from something like that, or a hitter watching a home run just a second longer than a pitcher or catcher would like. Seriously, it’s not a big deal. Baseball players are grown@ss men, are their feelings really that easily hurt? Sack up and get over it!

  5. lukedunphysscienceproject - May 31, 2014 at 12:30 PM

    I’m torn about this. On one hand, the umps horribly mismanaged this situation. Price obviously should have been tossed after hitting Carp.

    On the other hand, the Red Sox need to shut the hell up about a) the Rays stealing a base with a 5 run lead. What, no team has ever come back from being down by 5? And b) about pitchers throwing at people. Sox pitchers are historically merciless when it comes to targeting opposing batters. Roger Clemens and Pedro Martinez are two of most notorious head hunters in modern baseball history.

  6. emopell - Jun 2, 2014 at 8:22 PM

    OK, when I MLB going to adopt the Hockey rule about leaving the bench to fight..especially the BS with the bull pens rushing in every time a pitch goes inside? Big Papi-Big Poopi!

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