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Must-click link: sexual depravity — and possibly rape — in the minor leagues

Jul 29, 2014, 9:46 AM EDT

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Dirk Hayhurst writes about his 2003 rookie league team, the Eugene Emeralds over at Sports on Earth. Specifically, their off-the-field sexual habits which ranged from mere immaturity and over-clocked machismo to what seems to have been, by any definition of the term, rape.

It started with mere exhibitionism — players letting other players watch through windows when they brought women back to their rooms, which they called “show time” — but eventually devolved into videotaping each other having sex without the consent of the woman involved. Then it devolved into sheer odiousness and, if one had been so inclined to speak up at the time, illegality: “running a train.” In which, with the lights out, a player would get out of bed, saying he needed to use the bathroom, only to be replaced by another player who would sneak in through the window and take his place without the woman knowing:

There is, of course, another name for “Running the Train”: rape. The women most likely didn’t know what was happening and could not have consented to it. Perhaps they were too afraid to object once they realized. When the subject came up, however, the guys on the team had a different explanation: “They wanted it, man. Besides, we joked about it before we brought them back to the hotel. You know, made them feel like it was their idea. Besides, chicks love ballplayers!”

“Aren’t you worried that this is going to come back to bite you in the ass?” I asked, after the latest recounting of the “train schedule.”

“Why? You gonna tell?”

Hayhurst is telling now (in pretty graphic terms, so be warned). And, as has so often happened in the past, someone, somewhere will probably give Hayhurst grief for talking about his past teammates and what went on in his baseball career. But this is way more serious than sharing conversations from the clubhouse. This is about a culture, present in some form in many places, but particularly acute in sports culture, that needs to be exposed and rooted out.

105 Comments (Feed for Comments)
  1. historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 9:51 AM

    What is Hayhurst’s purpose in making himself complicit in this kind of stuff? So you didn’t tell the police or forewarn the women? F**k you — you’re part of the problem. This is what they are specifically referring to when people call it “rape culture.” Don’t even think you’re a good guy for spilling the beans later. Coward.

    • danrizzle - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:04 AM

      I’m pretty sure Hayhurst’s purpose–or whether he’s a coward or a good guy–is irrelevant. These are beans that should be spilled, and better late than never.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:19 AM

        Do you think those women really feel grateful to know this now? He didn’t do anything noble here.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:20 AM

        No, not better late than never. He is using what those women went through for his own profit and adulation. That’s crap.

    • dsaverno - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:08 AM

      you know, as well as I do, that the decision to forewarn or tell isn’t as simple as you make it out. Unfortunately, his career was probably dependent on him keeping quiet. What organization would want a snitch? It would have been a whistle blower situation. And how well employees are treated that do blow whistles. It takes an internally strong person to handle the resulting pressure. How many regular people, put in that situation, would play the superhero and how many the blind bystander?

      Now don’t get me wrong, I’m not condoning the actions of his teammates or of him keeping quiet. I think we all agree that the right thing to do would be to alert authorities, but I don’t believe that many people, if put in that situation, would do the right thing. It says more about the human condition than some washed out professional game players.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:19 AM

        So, playing baseball is more important than doing the right thing by women??? That’s what you’re saying, you know — and that’s BS. I hope you don’t look the other way at your job. And, I hope that the people (read: WOMEN) you work with are well aware that you won’t do the right thing for them. This is what makes Chris Kluwe all the more admirable — because he did what so many people won’t but has to be done for things to change. Anyone who does less in this kind of situation is encouraging rape culture and discrimination. You are part of the problem or you do the right thing. Period.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:22 AM

        his career was probably dependent on him keeping quiet.

        Well then screw his career. If you believe that playing baseball for a living is worth staying silent about the sexual abuse of women then you don’t get to turn around 10 years later and say that baseball is a corrupt sport. He was and is part of the problem.

      • dsaverno - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:29 AM

        in a perfect world, I agree with you, historio, but this ain’t a perfect world. To an individual, yes, playing baseball, having a career, having the biggest screen tv, is more important than the greater good. It’s not right, it’s just how it is. Should do means nothing compared to did do.

        And we’re not even arguing about what the right thing to do was. We agree on that. I just think you give people too much credit.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:33 AM

        If each of you individually was willing to do it, the problem is solved. As long as you individually remain afraid to do the right thing, women lose. I’m not looking for a perfect world — I’m looking for one where I’m not less important than money to the men all around me. I don’t think I’m setting an unreasonable expectation here: be a decent human being. Sheesus.

      • largebill - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:05 PM

        BS! No one’s career is dependent on not reporting a rape. People may convince themselves that doing the right thing would hurt their career, but that rationalization for failing to act is no valid reason to turn a blind eye.

      • dsaverno - Jul 29, 2014 at 2:49 PM

        . . . baited, but I can’t let it go, chipper and big willie. You both missed my word ‘unfortunately’ before the statement from which you took umbrage. I believe that statement to be true. We won’t know if it is or not until someone comes out and accuses teammates of crimes. Ask Christophe Bassons, Kelly O’Haire, or Mary Willingham if their careers were ruined for being whistleblowers for far-less important crimes than the one we’re discussing here? Believe it or not, there are consequences for doing the right thing sometimes. This isn’t a book, a movie or a tv show. When the lights go on, you have to make your own living. I’m sorry if you think I’m wrong, but pretending about a fantasy world in which every good deed remains unpunished is blindingly juvenile.

        And I must qualify the above by saying that I do not condone the actions of the players in the article. They’re pigs as far as I’m concerned. I’m just trying to present a logical argument that situations and events don’t always play out to their maximum potential.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 4:28 PM

        The correct answer is still: do the right thing. It costs you nothing to tip off the women about what’s going on or just refuse to leave them alone with the guys that are up to no good whenever you can. How are they going to go to the boss and complain that you’re tipping off women that you’re videoing them and passing it around?

      • blacksables - Jul 30, 2014 at 8:44 AM

        I’m pretty sure in 2003, the local police would have had a Crime Stoppers (or similar) phone number.

        You know, the ones where you can make an anonymous phone call and report criminal activity.

        You know, so you can tell the police what is happening, where it’s happening at, and who is doing it. So they can set up a sting and catch the people.

        They usually offer a reward for convictions, also. I wonder if Hayhurst will try to collect it if one of his former teammates goes to jail.

    • sportsdrenched - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:19 AM

      I get what you’re saying. But I would hardly call him a coward. It would take the bravest of the brave, to blow the whistle in that situation. They likely would literally throw away everything they had spent their entire life working toward.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:21 AM

        Again, you’re saying that a guy’s career is more important than a woman’s physical security and dignity. That is what you are saying. Thanks.

      • sportsdrenched - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:33 AM

        What I’m saying is, I can see why a guy wouldn’t come forward in a situation like that, except for 11 years after the fact. Most of us would like to think that we would behave differently, but very few of us have been in a situation like that. Which is why I would hesitate to call him a coward.

        You’re shooting the messenger here.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:37 AM

        You mean: very few of you guys think you would behave differently. I don’t believe the women on here would do nothing — at least warn the women. If you were female, I think you’d see this differently.

      • sportsdrenched - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:54 AM

        I think a higher percentage of women would act differently. Not all of them.

      • sportsdrenched - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:01 AM

        Furthermore, I think calling people a coward that might say something, but didn’t, and then come forward later….give them more reason to not come forward at all.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:31 AM

        Holy S***t! You really want to say that calling someone out for not doing the right thing much after the fact in any way justifies not doing the right thing??? Just stop. You clearly have no idea what it’s like to be sexually harassed or assaulted. I am happy that even when I had a job as a teenager, a number of the guys I worked with knew and were willing to stand up for me.

      • yahmule - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:12 PM

        Sportsdrenched, how do we change the culture unless we start holding everybody to a standard consistent with common human decency? Including the guys who enable and embolden the predators with their silence?

      • sportsdrenched - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:05 PM

        I don’t have all the answers. Awareness, education, empathy and caring for other humans, and punishment for the perpetrators…I do know one thing. Making the atmosphere MORE difficult for those to come forward; whether it’s the victim or a person who was silent at the time, but now wants to come forward isn’t part of that solution.

        If I know about a sexual assault that I could have stopped, and thought about coming forward after that fact because my conscience is eating at me, but then read others who did the same being called cowards…I’m going to at least reconsider my course of action.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 2:04 PM

        Seriously, you think this is harsh???

    • natocoles - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:00 PM

      Hayhurst screwed up all these years by being silent, and this article in no way excuses what he did.

      That being said, at least he’s saying something now.

      And if you’re wondering how hard it is to be a whistleblower, ask yourself this: how much criticism do you think Dirk is receiving right now, compared to the amount that all of his teammates and coaches on that team are receiving right now? Because I don’t see any of the rapists from the Eugene ballclub mentioned by name anywhere in the comments here.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:03 PM

        Really? You think this is harsh? Harsh enough that people would not speak up about RAPE?

        Feel free to speak out against those teammates though. I’ll wait for you to….

      • yahmule - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:08 PM

        Seems very self serving to me. Very much like Chris Kluwe throwing a couple Vikings out there for a sexual situation with an underage girl a couple years after it happened. He was fine with being complicit in the cover-up until he got mad at the team.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:33 PM

        Because I don’t see any of the rapists from the Eugene ballclub mentioned by name anywhere in the comments here.

        You do realize he changed the names of the individuals involved, right? So the only way we’d know who he was referring to is if: A, one of the other players outed the individuals, B, one of the women stepped up outing a player or two, or C, Hayhurst outs the player(s). He’s never done C, I doubt anyone will do A, and leaving it up to the victims isn’t likely to happen either.

    • doctorofsmuganomics - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:05 PM

      don’t hold back. Tell us how you really feel.

    • sabatimus - Jul 30, 2014 at 9:39 AM

      I’m on the fence here. On one hand I think Hayhurst was a coward for not at least outing the people who did it right after it happened and waiting 11 years. On the other hand I don’t know if or what Hayhurst was threatened with–bodily harm? (Note: I’ve only read this article and not Hayhurst’s because things like this disturb me enough as it is) If bodily harm, I could see Hayhurst keeping his mouth shut.

      But then I think of the women involved, and of the likelihood that they were, ahem, compromised…and it makes me sick. I’m not sure I could live 11 years without outing those sons of b**ches. I’d feel almost like an accomplice.

      However, in any event, I’m glad this story came out–stuff like this NEEDS to come out in order to first become aware of the culture and then hopefully change it.

  2. timmmah10 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:00 AM

    This guy waits 10 years to “come forward” when it only can profit him and I believe, the statute of limitations protects the offenders?

    Congrats, that sounds a lot like “accomplice” or at the very least “obstruction of justice.”

    • natocoles - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:03 PM

      He’s getting paid per article, and I sincerely doubt he’s getting a bonus for writing this article as opposed to filling the page with other random baseball stuff. He could’ve written about anything under the sun. He chose to write about this. You really think Hayhurst was sitting there thinking “mwaha, I can maximize my journalistic profits by writing about this story! They’re sure to double my commission after I publish this!”

      • largebill - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:09 PM

        Sure he “get paid per article.” However, you can bet if his article get notoriety and get lots of page views, etc he will get paid more in time. Writers don’t paid merely by the amount of ink spilled, but rather by the interest generated by that ink (or pixels nowadays).

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:10 PM

        Do you think he’s afraid his boss will reprimand him for the article and put him on a two day suspension or something?

  3. williamnyy23 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:01 AM

    Hayhurst should not be given grief for talking about his past teammates…but he should absolutely be criticized for NOT talking it about when they were teammates in the PRESENT. If Hayhurst had spoken up then, instead of now, who knows how many women would have avoided being subjected to the acts he is only now discussing.

  4. themuddychicken - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:13 AM

    I also felt the uneasy of him remaining silent so long, but he also has one thing now that he didn’t have a decade ago: a platform. That’s no small deal.

    • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:18 AM

      While it’s true that he wasn’t a writer 11 years ago, I am certain that if he wanted to tell the authorities what was going on they would have listened and in a situation like this, they are the audience that should matter.

      • themuddychicken - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:34 AM

        I don’t disagree with this either.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:34 PM

        I am certain that if he wanted to tell the authorities what was going on they would have listened and in a situation like this, they are the audience that should matter.

        I’d like to think this were true, but considering how badly the police/colleges/society handles rape/sexual assault, I’m not too sure…

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:26 PM

        I agree with you (as the case of Jameis Winston pointed out) however, minor league baseball is regarded a whole lot differently and it’s one thing for it to be a he said she said and a whole other ball game if someone comes in and says “this happened, I know because I witnessed it”

  5. ThatGuy - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:13 AM

    Its easy to sit here, behind the wall of the internet with pseudonames and say “Well, he should have came forward then. I would have, he’s a coward” or something along those lines.

    But as a 21 year old, in a locker room full of other early 20s, in your first season of pro ball. Coming forward likely ends his career before it begins, because of the specific culture talked about in the article.

    I’m sure all of us made the correct moral decision, consequences be damned, with absolutely everything we did when we were 21…

    I’d imagine if he could do it over, he would. But like doesn’t work that way. Sometimes you make mistakes.

    • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:17 AM

      Bull crap. Even at 21 if you don’t know what those guys were doing was wrong then you have some serious soul searching to do.

      • koufaxmitzvah - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:24 AM

        People tend to do a lot of soul searching after the age of 21 because of that.

        Our brains don’t stop growing until 25 for women and 27 for men.

        I would much rather the Rape Culture be discussed at some point than never.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:31 PM

        This wasn’t soul searching – this was self promotion

      • dsaverno - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:26 AM

        bull crap to your bull crap. Of course people know things are morally wrong. It’s the consequences they don’t want to be a part of. Do you really think being a whistle blower is an easy gig? Is it worth more for the greater good to expose injustices to the detriment of one individual? Absolutely. But who sacrifices himself for the greater good? People are inherently selfish. Saint chip56 might, but most of us wouldn’t.

        I think most of us would like to believe we would do the right thing, but that’s just the Walter Mitty in us.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:30 PM

        Hayhurst has no problem being a whistle blower now that doing so offers him a chance to promote his own brand. He’s a coward

      • ThatGuy - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:31 AM

        Knowing its wrong, and recognizing the scale of how wrong it is and or what to do about it are different things.

        Like I said, calling someone a coward from your internet handle is easy.

        I’m quite sure weighing the pro’s and con’s, or even recognizing the extreme gravity of the situation at 21 is not.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:21 PM

        I would call Hayhurst a coward to his face.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:54 AM

        Boys will be boys. You know, you can’t expect a 21 year old man — who can vote and sign a binding contract — to understand the moral gravity of the situation — especially not the way EVERY 21 YEAR OLD WOMAN would.

      • ThatGuy - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:30 AM

        Even 21 year old women make decisions that later in life they regret. I know plenty of men and women that regret decisions they consciously made in college.

        I imagine it feels great for you to have a life batting average of 1.000, but most people make mistakes, learn from them and try their best to rectify/atone for them.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:24 PM

        There’s a difference between boys will be boys stupidity that we did at 21 and participating in gang rape which is the picture Hayhurst paints.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:42 AM

        We aren’t talking about dumb life choices. We are talking about RAPE!!!! Do NOT minimize the crime. And just because you made a mistake doesn’t mean you get a free pass for recognizing it. I made mistakes — none of them were raping other people or staying silent when I saw such things going on. Now that I’m older, I d**n sure aren’t making the mistake of excusing people from being held accountable for their complicity in crimes. CRIMES, dude.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:38 PM

        Even 21 year old women make decisions that later in life they regret. I know plenty of men and women that regret decisions they consciously made in college.

        But guess what, those women got to make the decision for themselves. The women in the story may have wanted to sleep with two guys at once, but it’s their choice to make. The women in the story may have wanted to be video taped, but it’s their choice to make.

        When you pull a disappearing act and have someone take you place in bed with a woman, and that second guy has sex without her knowing it. She hasn’t made a choice, and it’s rape. When you secretly video tape a woman without her consent, or leave a door slightly ajar so others can watch you, that’s without her consent. Notice a pattern here…

    • williamnyy23 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:21 AM

      I would agree with you 100% if Hayhurst, by his own account, didn’t fully realize the potential criminality of what was occurring, so much so he even discussed it with his teammates. Being young and peer pressure are never good excuses for knowingly turning a blind eye toward a very serious crime.

    • yahmule - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:16 PM

      This is such a load of horsecrap. The idea that a guy with actual major league ability would get blackballed over this is ridiculous. The biggest hurdle he would face is getting team executives to do anything. Unfortunately, after warning one or two women, his asshole predator teammates would figure it out and stop letting him hang around.

    • blacksables - Jul 30, 2014 at 8:35 AM

      The soldier who blew the whistle on his fellow troops at Abu Ghraib had his career ruined. And a good portion of his life. He still did it. Know why?

      Because it was the right thing to do.

      And he did for no profit. Imagine that.

  6. chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:16 AM

    I agree with two of the posts above. Hayhurst’s fault isn’t in coming forward and talking about what went on. It is in coming forward and talking about what went on as a means of profit rather than at the time when the authorities could have done something about it.

    He’s a coward for not having the guts to break the “code of silence” in the locker-room at the time because he feared it would negatively impact his baseball career and he’s a disgusting individual for now using the treatment of these women as a means for profit and attention.

    • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:30 AM

      The only right way for him to talk about this now is as a mea culpa — and with a fundraising and awareness campaign about violence against women (in sports!!!).

      • simon94022 - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:15 AM

        Fundraising for whom?

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:18 AM

        Any one of a number of non-profits that aid victims of sexual violence or do training and education on reporting and stopping it.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:44 PM

        absolutely correct.

    • jwbiii - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:56 AM

      Then so is everyone else who has played minor league ball, which is almost every major league player except for the occasional Yu Darvish. Unless you think these felonious and disgusting practices are limited to the Padres’ system. Heh. The Josh Lueke case would suggest otherwise. All of the baseball players we cheer for were either participants in these type of depraved activities or were complicit. All of them. I’ll bet the under on any other men’s professional sports being any different.

      • largebill - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:14 PM

        The attitude may be pervasive, but please refrain from using words like “all of the baseball players . . . ” It is not all. It isn’t close to all. Just as not every kid in college is a rapist. Just as not every plumber is a rapist.

      • jwbiii - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:38 PM

        I disagree. If players were passing videos of the previous night’s action around in the locker room, every player knew about it. Even the non-participants were complicit. I’m not saying every player, every college student, or every plumber is a rapist, or even that all, or even most, of these sexual encounters constitute rape. Some of the ones Hayhurst describes certainly were and some of those videos were taken without the consent of the women involved, and all of the players knew about it, which makes them all complicit.

      • chip56 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:23 PM

        And I’m disgusted that more players don’t come forward and break the code of silence.

        But what disgusts me even more is that this jackwagon is using it to make money and build his brand.

  7. paperlions - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:39 AM

    Does anyone really think that Hayhursts team mates were unique in their behavior or invented it within the context of minor league baseball?

    The horrifying thing is that this is likely to be common behavior and fairly standard practice that is decades old in minor league baseball and for sports teams on college campuses.

    • sportsdrenched - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:59 AM

      I read this an hour ago and have been trying to get my mind around it. This is close to one of the threads I have. All of this is still going on. Right now! Tonight, at every ballpark that has it’s lights on.

      Not sure there’s a way to do anything about it. Except to educate the women in our live that if you get around a locker-room this is the type of thing you will encounter.

      • paperlions - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:01 AM

        Yep. It is horrifying. It is like watching a special on human trafficking…..yeah, it’s a show….but whatever was discussed is likely just the tip of the iceberg and millions of people are experiencing that horror at this very moment…..but as long as society acts like it doesn’t exist, people can ignore it.

      • dsaverno - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:12 AM

        yes, I completely agree. I may be a cynic about this mortal coil, but perhaps education and disgust resulting from discussions like this one about articles like that one will affect a change moving forward. It’s the best bet.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:55 AM

        I have no idea why women go for these guys. Really. I love baseball. I’m not chasing minor leaguers.

      • skids003 - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:12 PM

        histrio, $$$.

      • yahmule - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:23 PM

        Why do you think a lot of women go for jocks? Even minor leaguers without a pot to piss in? They’re young, physically fit and quite often supremely confident.

      • indaburg - Jul 29, 2014 at 3:00 PM

        My dad gave me a piece of advice when I was a young baseball loving girl: “Never date a ball player.” I am so glad I listened.

    • unclemosesgreen - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:15 AM

      There is absolutely no need to limit this to sports. American colleges and universities have a long and shameful history of covering up rape and sexual assault on and off campus.

      http://www.globalresearch.ca/rampant-sexual-violence-against-women-and-rape-on-college-campuses-across-america/5391303

      • paperlions - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:22 AM

        Oh, I know. I’ve studied/worked on college campuses nearly my entire adult life…..the crap you hear that administrators and cops tell female students to strong arm them into dropping charges are horrifying. Essentially, they try to isolate and shame them into going away quietly. I’ve heard some of the stories first hand…they are infuriating.

        College campuses will do anything they can to make parents feel like their kids will be safe on campus…including deliberate under reporting of violent crimes.

      • larrytsg - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:43 PM

        Yeah, college campuses, and most places where they have their own “security force” believe that they can handle issues regarding the law all by themselves. They can’t, and the sooner they learn to act in cooperation with local Law Enforcement, the better it will be, and the less we will see of this “two tier” legal system.

        My daughter is currently an RA (Resident Assistant) at a small college, and while most of their issues are with drunkenness, weed smoking, and making a nuisance, they have had to deal with rape this past year. It’s not as uncommon on college campuses as everyone would like to believe.

  8. barrywhererufrom - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:43 AM

    Sickening..

  9. sabathiawouldbegoodattheeighthtoo - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:51 AM

    Meanwhile, MLB goes nuts (and Congress hold hearings) about guys using testosterone lozenges and HGH.

  10. Matt - Jul 29, 2014 at 10:57 AM

    I think that there can simultaneously be value in Dirk coming forward now and shining a light on the culture that is present in the minors in the hopes that doing so helps to rectify it in the future, while also facing legitimate criticism over not coming forward at the time.

    If we solely vilify those who come forward, and shine a light onto these types of deplorable acts, even if they are doing so too late to help those who were harmed in the moment, then I think we are serving to continue to gag and silence these stories, allowing this type of culture to perpetuate without scrutiny.

    • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:52 AM

      I would be totally okay with calling his old teammates/perpetrators out too. If you wouldn’t tell the truth even later for fear of being called out for your complicity then you’re a double coward who hasn’t grown in your life.

      • Matt - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:30 PM

        I’m completely on board with that, and with calling him out for the harm that his earlier silence likely helped cause. However, I am not on board with some of the above sentiment (not necessarily from you, I’m speaking more broadly here) which seems to be making the argument that he’s somehow worse for speaking up now than he would be if he continued to keep silent. While he is getting paid for the writing of this article, this would have been the case no matter the topic he wrote about, or if he merely wrote about the deplorable misogyny and left out the parts about rape. His choice to write about this topic and include all of these details, even at this late date, does seem to be a net positive as it raises the awareness for everyone, and hopefully inspires the next minor leaguer to speak up.

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:32 PM

        It would’ve been nice if the article was along the lines of: I kept silent and I regret it, which is why I am partnering with this anti-violence campaign…

      • Matt - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:38 PM

        Sure. I think that’s a fair statement as well. But I think some of the sentiment expressed above goes beyond this type of reasonable criticism, and into more heavy handed language which I read as saying his writing and publishing this story is, in and of itself, something to be seen as bad.

    • indaburg - Jul 29, 2014 at 3:12 PM

      Your viewpoint is very reasonable, Matt. You do realize this is the internet?

  11. natocoles - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:27 AM

    Hayhurst screwed up by saying nothing at the time, and for so long, but to everybody who’s criticizing him: you’re now going to go look up the roster and list of coaches of the Eugene minor league team and call out each of those guys by name, too, right?

    It’s really friggin’ hard to be a whistleblower, you know.

    • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:53 AM

      This is why it’s even harder to make a rape complaint. Who’s going to have the nerve to back you up?

  12. sadpandarevolt - Jul 29, 2014 at 11:53 AM

    Man. The mental gymnastics people will do to defend a guy who was complicit in covering this up for years and then only brought it up when it could benefit him are just…. horrible.

  13. uknowimright1 - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:05 PM

    Boo hoo hoo…I am sooo sick of the “helpless women” stories…how about some ACCOUNTABILITY for these ADULT women VOLUNTARILY placing themselves in risky situations & also not always taking the time to actually get to thoroughly know who they are socializing with?!? PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY, regardless of gender, HAS to come into play at some point!

    • doctorofsmuganomics - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:08 PM

      Please, go walk in front of traffic

      • uknowimright1 - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:34 PM

        Fool

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 3:06 PM

        That’s “Dr. Fool” to you!

      • doctorofsmuganomics - Jul 29, 2014 at 7:56 PM

        Dam right

    • wonkypenguin - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:44 PM

      Interesting point. What percentage of a man being a douche, recording someone without their knowledge, or setting up a rape train should a woman being accountable for? 10%? And if they are too drunk to know the difference, is that more like 2%? Or is the fact that they are simply women enough to make it 50%?

      The problem here (which I know you don’t care about at all, but I thought I would add just for fun) is that their ability to consent (which is where PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY comes in) has been taken away from them. I’m all for women having consensual sex with whomever they would like, but they do NOT have to take responsibility for these asshole’s behaviors.

      I’ll get you the number for the Ray Rice Fan Club in a second…

      • uknowimright1 - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:53 PM

        Like I said, boo hoo hoo…sounds like excuses for poor choices to me.

      • uknowimright1 - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:58 PM

        KNOW who you socialize with…if you don’t, then YOU, as an ADULT are at LEAST partially to blame for what transpires…alcohol is an EXCUSE.

      • uknowimright1 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:11 PM

        But I’m just a helpless ADULT woman, I had no idea that I was drunk, I’m soooo helpless…boo hoo hoo…if you, regardless of gender, are STUPID enough to place yourself in risky situations (sometimes REPEATEDLY) then you have no business leaving the house…it’s called living a smart LIFESTYLE & making right CHOICES…I’m sure the women alluded to in this story were so-called ADULTS, correct?

      • historiophiliac - Jul 29, 2014 at 2:18 PM

        What? We shouldn’t leave the house? Lol GFY

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - Jul 29, 2014 at 2:33 PM

        if you, regardless of gender, are STUPID enough to place yourself in risky situations (sometimes REPEATEDLY) then you have no business leaving the house

        If you think the risk is equal between a man and a woman in these situations, I hope you don’t procreate.

      • [citation needed] fka COPO - Jul 29, 2014 at 2:33 PM

        if you, regardless of gender, are STUPID enough to place yourself in risky situations (sometimes REPEATEDLY) then you have no business leaving the house

        If you think the risk is equal between a man and a woman in these situations, I hope you don’t procreate.

  14. skipcastaneda - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:17 PM

    I have heard of this type of stuff going in the minor leagues. I know someone who had a friend who played pro ball in the early 90’s, and he said guys were always bringing women back to the apartments they lived in and things would get out of control.

  15. wonkypenguin - Jul 29, 2014 at 12:40 PM

    I’d give him more credit (not a lot because, y’know, rape and all that) if he didn’t change the names. Be an actual whistleblower if you’re gonna do it.

  16. mikhelb - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:49 PM

    wow an entry like this will surely make some people go crazy, the three or four that always go mmmmmaaaaaddd.

  17. jre80 - Jul 29, 2014 at 1:53 PM

    Bad timing in coming clean, but anyone outside of a bubble knows this goes on. That’s where the term gold digger comes from. This article just gives a reality check on what goes on behind closed doors. I used to have a job traveling making good $$ and that’s how it goes (not me personally). Rape is a strong word. I don’t think that was the case here.

    • uknowimright1 - Jul 30, 2014 at 12:02 AM

      You are so correct jre80, but we got ALOT of fools in DEEP DENIAL on this page, LOL! They refuse to accept the FACT that there ARE HO’S & $LUTS EVERYWHERE…what WORLD do these FOOLS live in?!?

  18. Bob Loblaw - Jul 29, 2014 at 2:17 PM

    Just when I thought I was sick of Dirk Hayhurst…I get even sicker. Dude just shut up and go away. we get it. Bad things happened in the Minor Leagues. You chose to not say anything and then write books and make money off your time there. Which to me means you are not only an ex-minor leaguer jag off like the people you talk about, but a hypocritical one as well. Congrats.

  19. stercuilus65 - Jul 30, 2014 at 8:08 PM

    These players need to learn that sometimes rape isn’t funny.

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